Religious Perceptions in America: With an In-Depth Analysis of U.S. Attitudes Toward Muslims and Islam

About 43 percent of Americans say they feel at least a little prejudice against Muslims, a significantly higher number than those who have prejudice against Christians, Jews, and Buddhists, this Gallup report reveals.

The report, “Religious Perceptions in America: With an In-Depth Analysis of U.S. Attitudes Toward Muslims and Islam” also reveals Islam is the most negatively viewed out of those four religions. Nearly a third of Americans say their opinions about Islam are “not favorable at all.”

Gallup poll shows stronger prejudice against Muslims in US

About 43 percent of Americans say they feel at least a little prejudice against Muslims, a significantly higher number than those who have prejudice against Christians, Jews or Buddhists, a recent Gallup report reveals.

The report, “Religious Perceptions in America: With an In-Depth Analysis of U.S. Attitudes Toward Muslims and Islam” also reveals Islam is the most negatively viewed out of the four religions. Nearly a third of Americans say their opinions about Islam are “not favorable at all.”

Gallup Poll: Obama receives highest approval from Muslims, among other faiths

A new Gallup Poll during President Obama’s first 100 days in office finds broad support for him among Americans affiliated with most major US religions. US Muslims and Jews gave Obama his highest approval rating, at 85 percent and 79 percent respectively. He also received a favorable response from the majority of Roman Catholics and Protestants polled. According to this latest polling, Obama’s highest approval came from Muslims – more than all other faiths polled. The results of this poll are based on telephone interviews with nearly 100,000 adults polled nationally, conducted between January 21-April 29, 2009.

French Public Accepting of Religious and Ethnic Minorities: But most are uncomfortable with outward signs of piousness

PRINCETON, NJ — Hopes that France’s recent legislative elections would result in greater ethnic representation to reflect the country’s diversity were dashed when only one of the 555 National Assembly seats for metropolitan France went to a minority candidate. But at the Hôtel Matignon, the government’s Paris headquarters, the situation looked a bit brighter for advocates of diversity. Three individuals visibly identifiable as minorities out of 19 portfolios now hold minister-level posts. And President Nicolas Sarkozy’s highest profile appointment went to Rachida Dati, a female lawyer of North African ancestry, who heads the Justice Ministry.

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