Britons link Islam with extremism, says survey

Most people in the UK associate Islam with extremism and the repression of women, a survey has suggested. The online YouGov poll found 58% of those questioned linked Islam with extremism while 69% believed it encouraged the repression of women.

The survey of 2,152 adults was commissioned by the Exploring Islam Foundation. The organisation has launched a poster campaign on London transport to combat negative perceptions of Muslims.

BBC home editor Mark Easton says the survey, conducted last month, paints a negative picture of British attitudes to Islam. Asked if Muslims had a positive impact on British society, the YouGov poll found four out of 10 disagreed with the statement. Half linked Islam with terrorism, just 13% thought it was based on peace and 6% associated it with justice. Some 60% admitted they did not know much about the religion, but a third said they would like to know more.

The Exploring Islam Foundation hopes to challenge the negative views of the religion with its Inspired By Muhammad project. It will feature posters of Muslim professionals, displayed in central London locations such as bus stops and tube stations, alongside messages emphasising the ways in which Muslims balance religious tradition with contemporary human rights and social responsibility. This campaign is important because it can help non-Muslims to better understand the faith that inspires and guides their Muslim friends, neighbours and colleagues

Remona Aly, campaigns director for the foundation, said many Muslims were concerned about the way their faith was perceived by the public. “We want to foster a greater understanding of what British Muslims are about and our contribution to British society. We are proud of being British and being Muslim,” she said.

A spokesman for the Quilliam Foundation , the counter-extremism think tank, welcomed the campaign, describing it as a “timely step to help improve relations and foster deeper understanding between British citizens”.

“This campaign is important because it can help non-Muslims to better understand the faith that inspires and guides their Muslim friends, neighbours and colleagues. This initiative also helps British Muslims reclaim the Prophet Muhammad as a time-honoured guide for peace, compassion and social justice from those who seek to twist his teachings.”

Britons link Islam with extremism, says survey

Most people in the UK associate Islam with extremism and the repression of women, a survey has suggested. The online YouGov poll found 58% of those questioned linked Islam with extremism while 69% believed it encouraged the repression of women.

The survey of 2,152 adults was commissioned by the Exploring Islam Foundation. The organisation has launched a poster campaign on London transport to combat negative perceptions of Muslims.

BBC home editor Mark Easton says the survey, conducted last month, paints a negative picture of British attitudes to Islam. Asked if Muslims had a positive impact on British society, the YouGov poll found four out of 10 disagreed with the statement. Half linked Islam with terrorism, just 13% thought it was based on peace and 6% associated it with justice. Some 60% admitted they did not know much about the religion, but a third said they would like to know more.

London taxis to extol virtues of Islam

The purple, pink and green sign on the yellow London taxi reads: “The rights of women are sacred.” This is not some spiritual feminist mantra born of the New Age, but comes out of one of the most traditional religions in the world.

The advertisement marks the launch of a campaign to promote a positive image of Islam, a religion not widely known for its promotion of the rights of women. The negative view of a faith followed by nearly 1.6 billion people, or one fifth of the world’s population, is the main reason for the launch of the Inspired by Muhammad campaign.

After a new poll showed that 58 per cent of people associate Islam with extremism and 50 per cent with terrorism, the campaign is intended to promote a positive Islamic message about the environment and social justice as well as women. The campaign was launched by the Exploring Islam Foundation, a new and privately funded group run by young British Muslim professionals.