Report – Religion and Diasporas: Challenges of the Emigration Countries

Religion and Diasporas – Challenges of the Emigration Countries

Citation:

Jocelyne Cesari, Religion and Diasporas: Challenges of the Emigration Countries, INTERACT RR 2013/01, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, San Domenico di Fiesole (FI): European University Institute, 2013.

Abstract:

Using the theoretical framework of transnational studies and sociology of religion, this paper identifies  the most significant factors that influence the religious dimensions of the emigration countries: the majority or minority status of the migrant group in the receiving countries as well as the pre-existing level of politicization of religion in the sending countries. It shows that the interactions of sending and receiving countries take place in religious terms in a broader transnational space including deterritorialized religious and political actors.

Emin Poljarevic

Project Responsibilities: Scandinavia news and research

Positions: Affiliated researcher with the Department of Political Social Studies at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy

 

Personal Website

Area of Expertise:

  • Modern Islamic History
  • Islamist Social Movements
  • Islam and Muslim Minorities in Scandinavia
  • Sociology of Islam

Background:
Emin Poljarevic holds a PhD (2012) and M.Res. from the European University Institute (2008MA from the University of Uppsala (2006) and ). Previously he worked as a research assistant and project coordinator at the Centre for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Uppsala University (2004-2007). Here he conducted research on social security issues in Balkans, Caucasus and Central Asia.  During his PhD studies, he was a visiting assistant professor at the SAXO Institute, University of Copenhagen (2010/11). Poljarevic has presented papers at an extensive range of conferences, and has published several book chapters and articles. His current research interests intersect between social movement studies, the study of state repression, and dynamics of social motivations. At the time he is developing a postdoctoral research project intended to explore patterns of socio-political shifts in the Middle East and North Africa with special focus on Islamist social movement organizations.

The Social building of Muslim Communities in Europe

A Roundtable By The Network On Comparative Research On Islam And Muslims In Europe (NOCRIME)

Session 1: The Social Building of Muslim Communities in Europe: Internal Factors

Opening remarks and Introduction by Jean Baubérot, President of EPHE (Sorbonne) and Director of GSRL (CNRS-EPHE) and Jean-Paul Willaime, EPHE, Associate Director of GSRL (CNRS-EPHE).

CHAIR : Dr Martin Van Bruinessen, Institute for the Study of Islam in the Modern World [ISIM] Leiden.

  • Jorgen Baek Simonsen, Copenhague University , “Social Networks of Muslims in Denmark and Interactions with the Muslim World”
  • Nico Landman, Utrecht University, “Social and Religious variety of the Muslim Presence in the Netherlands”
  • Sean McLoughlin, Leeds University, “British-Muslims Today: National Recognition, Local Polarisation?”
  • Gema Martin-Munoz, University Autonoma of Madrid, “Cultural and Religious Dimensions of the Moroccan Immigration in Spain”
  • Ottavia Schmidt di Frieberg, University of Trieste, “Transnational Networks of Muslim Migrants in Italy”
  • Discussion led by Pierre-Jean Luizard, GSRL (CNRS-EPHE) and Hocine Benkheira, GSRL (CNRS-EPHE)

    Session 2: The Building of Muslim Communities in Europe: External Constraints

    CHAIR: Jean-Paul Willaime, EPHE, Associate Director of GSRL (CNRS-EPHE)

  • Jocelyne Cesari, GSRL (CNRS-EPHE) and Harvard University, “New forms of Muslim Leadership in France”
  • Chantal Saint-Blancat, University of Padova, “Social Construction of Islam in the Italian Public Sphere”
  • Valerie Amiraux, CURAPP/CNRS and European University Institute, “The Production of Discourses on Islam in Western Europe”
  • DISCUSSION of the Session and General Discussion led by Tariq Ramadan, University of Fribourg and Olivier Roy, CNRS.

    CONCLUDING REMARKS