Call for Papers: “Multiculturalism in a Globalised Society: European Muslims, Identity and Citizenship”

Venue: Park Campus, University of Northampton,
Northampton NN2 7AL, UK

This conference gathers academics, journalists, researchers, policy makers, youth workers, civil society organisations and other members of the public to discuss issues around Muslims in Europe, identity, citizenship and belonging. It aims to address issues relating to Muslims’ engagement or disengagement with the mainstream European society; what challenges are there for their positive participation in the success of the multiculturalism model. It will also aim to map out Muslims’ use of the media and the extent to which that helps define who they are.

Conference themes:

This conference will cover (but not necessarily limited to) the following areas of enquiry:

– European or Muslim: What do Muslims in Europe believe to be their identity?

– Multiculturalism and Integration: What does this actually mean?

– Active citizenship: What does this mean in Islamic terms?

– The relationship between British Muslims and the global Muslim community – the Ummah.

– The rise of political Islam – Islamism

– Post 9/11 Radicalisation and terrorism

– New media and youth/women empowerment.

– Youth subcultures and new media, what is going on?

– What functions are the internet and satellite TV playing in engaging/disengaging Muslim communities?

Call for submissions:
Abstracts of no more than 400 words, along with a short bio should be submitted by the 15th October 2010. Papers should reflect one or more of the conference themes mentioned above. Particularly welcome are papers based on empirical work and a clear research method (s).

Submission deadlines:
Submission of abstracts: 15th October 2010
Notification of acceptance: 3rd November 2010
Submission of full papers: 26th January 2011
Selected conference papers will be published in an edited volume.

Please send all submissions and enquiries to Dr Noureddine Miladi (conference coordinator), E-mail: noureddine.miladi@northampton.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1604 892104

Low support for radicalism among European Muslims

15 September 2010
Support for radical Islamist groups is low among European Muslims and some leading groups with overseas roots are now cooperating with local governments and encouraging Muslims to vote, according to a new report. European groups linked to wider Islamist movements such as the Muslim Brotherhood and Jamaat-i-Islami now focus more on conditions for Muslims in Europe than their original ideologies from Egypt and Pakistan, according to the report by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, on “Muslim Networks and Movements in Western Europe”.
The report also cited tensions between “jihadists” and peaceful Islamists in Europe, saying some groups linked to the Muslim Brotherhood were working with police to counter militants. “By most accounts, support for radical extremist groups is relatively low among Muslims in Europe,” it said. “Nevertheless, such groups have been central to the public discussion of Islam in Europe, especially in recent years.”
The report said supporters of European groups with links to foreign Islamist movements often showed little interest in their founding ideologies, which critics say are radical and anti-Western. Although some groups promoted militant views, others dealt only with religious issues or education, making it difficult to generalise about Muslim organisations in Western Europe.

European Muslims Perceptions of the Holocaust

International Conference Religions and Migrations

Local Diversity and Global Challenges
Religions and Migrations in Southern Europe

September 30 –October 1, 2010

Faculty of Arts of the University of Porto
(Via Panorâmica, s/n, 4150-564 Porto)
Porto, Portugal

Junta Islamica condemns terrorist group allegations on Al-Andalus territory

The Islamic association “Junta Islamica”, created in 1989 and primarily composed of Spanish converts, has publicly condemned the references some terrorist groups have made about the re-conquest of the old Al-Andalus territory.

Mansur Escuero, Junta Islamica’s president, says such declarations damage the image of European Muslims. He added that Spanish Muslims are full European citizens with the same rights and obligations as any other citizen, and they aren’t trying to conquer any territories. 


European Muslims call for peace in Pakistan

Led by the Grand Mufti of Bosnia, high Muslim authorities in Europe – shaykh Naim Ternava, Grand Mufti of Kosovo, Selim Muqaj, Grand Mufti of Albania, Sulejman Rexhepi, Grand Mufti of Macedonia, Dr. Mansur Escudero, President of the Junta Islamica of Spain, shaykha Halima Krausen, Germany, Mr. Hasan Le Gai Eaton, UK, shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad, UK and Jusuf Islam, UK, with shaykh Dr. Mustafa Ceric, have sent the ulema (Islamic scholars) in Pakistan a letter for peace, dialogue and understanding.

This call has been announced in Urdu, Arabic and English languages across the world, as a sign of European Muslims’ concern of everyday violence on Pakistani streets and mosques.

Op-Ed by Robert Leiken: European radicals and jihadists are still different from American radicals

Nixon Center Director for Immigration and National Security and author of the forthcoming “Europe’s Angry Muslims” says European plotters are more connected to each other and to jihadist movements and training camps abroad than would-be American Muslim terrorists.

He cites the greater number of radicals in Europe, their ties to one another, their organic ties to training camps in Pakistan and Afghanistan, as major differences. He also says the “clash of civilizations” that happens to offspring of labor migrants from rural villages doesn’t happen to Muslims in America, who mostly hail from business and professional families and who typically make more money than the average American.

He says what both groups share, however, is the narrative of Muslims being oppressed all over the world, usually by the United States.

UK Muslims are Europe’s most patriotic

Muslims in Britain are the most patriotic in Europe – but more than a quarter in some parts of the country still do not feel British, according to a new study. The report, funded by George Soros, the billionaire philanthropist, found that on average 78 percent of Muslims identified themselves as British, although this dropped by six points in east London. This compares with 49 percent of Muslims who consider themselves French and just 23 percent who feel German. The findings, based on more than 2,000 detailed interviews, suggest that Muslims may be better integrated in Britain than in other parts of the European Union.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali discusses her views on freedom, radical Islam, and the differences between American and European Muslims

In an interview with Ayaan Hirsi Ali, she shares her views on freedom, tolerance and intolerance, women’s rights, mainstream and radical Islam, and the differences between American and European Muslims.

Rarefied Islamophobia

There is an increasing trend among European intellectuals, politicians, and essayists to describe Islam as a major cause of the current identity crisis of most European countries. Christopher Caldwell’s book, Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West [see “New Book Stokes Fear of a Muslim Europe” by Bruce B. Lawrence], is based on the same simple premise that permeates today’s political and public discourse on Islam: Europe’s Muslims are responsible for the radical transformation and increased vulnerability of the continent’s culture and identity.