New report explores the identity of Latino Muslims in the United States

The Latino Muslims Survey (LMS), a social science oriented study of U.S. Latino Muslims, examined the religiosity of 560 Latino Muslims via an online, bilingual nationwide survey. The historic findings shed light on the intersection of religious beliefs and practices; spiritual, moral, social, and ethical views.  The study also examined the social, civic and political attitudes of the self-identified Latinos and Muslims.  The results of the study were published June 2017 in the Journal of Race, Ethnicity, and Religion. 

According to, Dr. Gaston Espinosa, Arthur V. Stoughton Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at Claremont McKenna College, one of the co-principals of the study, this research “is important because it is the largest survey ever conducted on the U.S. Latino Muslims and because it helps us to understand why Latinos are converting to Islam, what branches of Islam they are converting into, and their religious, social, gender, and political views.”

This comprehensive survey adds nuance to the understanding of Latino Muslims and reexamines the previously held notion that a majority of Latino Muslims coverts embraced Islam as a rejection of Catholicism.

Straw Under Fire for Linking Ethnicity to Sex Attacks

A row around race and sexual exploitation flared last night as opponents and supporters reacted to a suggestion by former home secretary Jack Straw that Pakistani men were grooming white girls for sexual abuse. The Blackburn MP made his comments on Friday night after two Asian men were sentenced that day for a series of rapes and sexual assaults on vulnerable young girls. Abid Mohammed Saddique, 27, was jailed for a minimum of 11 years at Nottingham Crown Court and Mohammed Romaan Liaqat, 28, was given eight years. The men were ringleaders of a gang who befriended girls as young as 12 in the Derby area and groomed them for sex.

Mr Straw told BBC’s Newsnight it was a “specific problem” in the Pakistani community. “These young men are in a Western society. In any event, they act like any other young men: they’re fizzing and popping with testosterone, they want some outlet for that. But Pakistani-heritage girls are off-limits and they are expected to marry a girl from Pakistan, typically. So they seek other avenues and they see these young women, white girls who are vulnerable, some of them in care… who they think are easy meat.”

Post-Immigration Minorities, Religion and National Identities

Registration is now available for the Bristol-UCL Leverhulme Programme on Migration and Citizenship conference on Post-Immigration Minorities, Religion and National Identities, 14-15 November, 2008 in Bristol. A limited number of places are available for non-paper givers and those not connected to the Programme.

The Leverhulme Programme team will address topics based on the following themes: Ethnic Enclaves and Economic Integration, Social Capital, Gender and Differential Educational and Economic Outcomes, National Identity, Citizenship and Religious ’Difference’ and Majoritarian Identities and Resentment of Multiculturalism.

Keynote speakers will address issues in relation to contemporary issues on minority ethnicity, religion, integration and national identity, and include:

  • Professor Zygmunt Bauman (Leeds)
  • Professor Craig Calhoun (New York University and President of the Social Science Research Council)
  • Professor Reina Lewis (London College of Fashion)
  • Professor Lord Bhikhu Parekh (Westminster)
  • Professor Roland Robertson (University of Pittsburgh and University of Aberdeen)

Over 50 additional papers will be presented. The conference will begin with registration at 9.30 – 10.30am on Friday, 14th November and the final paper session will conclude at about 6pm on Saturday, 15th November, followed by a dinner at 7.30pm.

Please find a registration form for the conference on our website here.

Contact: Sara Tonge (Leverhulme Conference Administrator)

Further details of the programme and centre.

Dutch minister wants to link crime and ethnicity

Interior Minister Guusje ter Horst has proposed that police and judicial authorities be allowed to register the ethnic background of criminals. At the moment, only the nationality or birthplace of suspects are registered in the Netherlands. Ter Horst said that she believes that this would not create or propagate stigmas of certain ethnic groups, but would point to important and realistic trends. “If you want to solve a problem you have to know who is causing it. And if in Amsterdam it’s mostly Moroccans, then you have to give it a name. Otherwise you lose information. Moreover, you can also get the Moroccan community involved” said ter Horst. The Social and Cultural Planning Office is currently studying the need for ethnic backgrounds in registrations; in December, it will report to the Integration Minister on the idea.

Full-text article available here. (Some news sites may require registration)

Islam, Ethnicity and the Banlieues

The most astonishing thing about the recent riots was the surprise of the media, in France as elsewhere, at this outbreak of violence. For indeed, violence in the suburbs is nothing new. In the 1980s, the suburbs of Paris and Lyon were similarly set aflame. And in November of 2004, the violence of the suburbs broke out in the very heart of Paris when two rival gangs clashed on the Champs Elysées. Nor is the isolation of French youth a new phenomenon. Since the 1981 “rodeo riots” in the Lyon suburb Les Minguettes, social and economic conditions in the suburbs have only deteriorated, despite the often generous funding of urban development projects. It is not sufficient, however, to attribute these outbreaks of violence solely to factors of social and economic marginality. This marginality is exacerbated by a general context of urban degradation: a degradation, furthermore, which affects a very specific sector of the population. That is, the crisis of the banlieues primarily concerns first- and second-generation immigrants from the former colonies of the Maghreb. This population has frequently been treated as a separate case, not only in terms of the history and conditions of immigration, but also in terms of the politics of integration. This constant exclusion results in the fact that the issues of poverty, ethnicity, and Islam tend to be conflated, both in current political discourse and in political practice. The recent violence is but the direct consequence of the constant amalgamation of these three separate issues.

European Muslims and the Secular State in a Comparative Perspective

Sorbonne: Salle Louis Liard 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris

European Muslims and the Secular State in a Comparative Perspective

NOCRIME CONFERENCE – Organized with the Sponsorship of the European Commission (DG Research)

MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2003

I. Modes of Interaction in Non-Muslim Societies

President Patrick Michel CNRS/CERI, EHESS, France

Discussant: Tuula Sakaranaho University of Helsinki, Finland

  • Jonas Otterbeck Silence and Speech in the Muslim Groups in Sweden Malmö University, Sweden
  • Lars Dencik Jewish Life in Sweden Roskilde University, Denmark
  • Philip Lewis Beyond Victimhood – from the Global to the Local: a British Case Study Bradford University, UK
  • II. Muslim Leadership and Institutional Constraints in Europe

    President Jean-Paul Willaime EPHE, Director of GSRL (CNRS-EPHE), France

    Discussant: Martin Van Bruinessen ISIM, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

  • Séan McLoughlin Islam, Citizenship and Civil Society: New Muslim Leaderships in the UK Leeds University, UK
  • Valérie Amiraux Building Religious Authorities among Muslims in Europe: Some Case Studies from Germany and France CURAPP-CNRS, France
  • Nico Landman New Policies on Foreign Imams in the Netherlands Utrecht University, The Netherlands
  • TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2003

    III. Religious Authorities in the Global Era: Ethnicity and Diasporas

    President Sami Zemni University of Ghent, Belgium

    Discussant: Jonathan Friedman EHESS, France

  • Jocelyne Cesari Muslim Leadership in Europe: What Connections with the Umma? GSRL-CNRS, Harvard University, NOCRIME coordinator, France/USA
  • Sébastien Fath Transnational Dimension of Evangelical Movements CNRS/GSRL, France
  • Yngve Lithman, Transnational Radicalism and Muslim Diasporas University of Bergen, Norway
  • Garbi Schmidt Formation of Transnational Identities among Young Muslims in Denmark Danish National Institute of Social Research, Denmark
  • IV. Islam and European Urban Life

    President: Tariq Ramadan University of Fribourg, Switzerland

    Discussant: Jose Casanova New School University, USA

  • Chantal Saint-Blancat/Ottavia Schmidt di Friedberg Visibility of Muslims in Italy and Communication Issues University of Padova, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Gema Martin-Munoz Mapping the Muslim Leadership in Spanish Urban Centers (Madrid and Barcelona) Autonoma University of Madrid, Spain
  • Dilwar Hussain Muslims in British Cities: Are they Different from Other Migrants? The Islamic Foundation, UK