No Charges for al-Haddad’s Comments in Amsterdam

22 June 2012

 

The public prosecution of Amsterdam will not bring chartes against Haitham al-Haddad for comments made during a debate in the city this spring. The event replaced a symposium at the city’s Vrij Universiteit, cancelled following commotion over al-Haddad’s presence. Anti-Islam campaigner Ehsan Jami called for legal action against al-Haddad, a British-Palestinian expert and controversial figure. Jami’s accusations were based on Al-Haddad’s comment that Sharia law prescribes the death penalty for ex-Muslims. The Amsterdam public prosecution declined to charge al-Haddad, stating that he had not committed any offenses because the conditions which he outlined for applying the death penalty clearly could not occur in the Netherlands.

Muslim immigration issue still roils Europe: Netherlands leads debate over policies

Ehsan Jami sees himself as the legendary Dutch boy who used his finger to plug a leaking dike. Jami, a Dutch politician, is trying to prevent a flood of what he views as intolerant Muslim immigrants threatening to overrun the Netherlands and all of Europe. He’s not alone. In France, Germany and across Western Europe, a vigorous public debate is under way over preservation of national identities, the assimilation of minorities and tolerance of different cultures. Shelley Emling reports.

Dutch leftist and rightist Islam critics speak up together

Critic of Islam, Ehsan Jami, and Freedom Party leader, Geert Wilders, compared the Prophet Mohammed to Adolf Hitler in a co-written article published in the Dutch daily Volkskrant Thursday. In their article, Wilders and Jami say strong criticism of Islam is absolutely necessary. “If we do not act now against the far-reaching Islamisation of the Netherlands, then the 1930s will be revived. The only difference is that back then the danger came from Adolf Hitler, while today it comes from Mohammed.”…

Concern about anti-Islam comments

ROTTERDAM – National Coordinator for Anti-terrorism (NCTb) Tjibbe Joustra fears the effects of the tone that some prominent Dutch are taking in the discussion of Islam, he says in the AD on Monday. The paper claims that Joustra is referring to statements from MP Geert Wilders and Ehsan Jami, founder of the Committee for Former Muslims. But a spokesperson for Joustra says his comments were made in general, without reference to any specific individuals. Joustra says in the paper: “When someone says those kinds of things, I have mixed feelings about that.” “Radical statements like that can be the straw that breaks the camel’s back for people who are on the verge of becoming violent.”

Ex-Muslims Demand Right to Renounce Islamic Faith

Are Ehsan Jami’s methods promoting religious tolerance in the Netherlands? Controversially, 9/11 was chosen as the date to sign the “European Declaration for Tolerance.” It aims to draw attention to what the former Muslims see as the lack of freedom of religion within Islam. Former Muslims from several European countries signed the declaration in the Hague on the sixth anniversary of the terror attacks in the United States Tuesday. Other signatories included many well-known Dutch politicians, authors and journalists. The date of the declaration, Sept.11, was symbolically chosen in order to condemn the terror and intolerance perpetuated by radical Islamic militants, though critics argue that choosing the date unfairly links Islam to terrorism.

Netherlands: Attitudes towards leaving Islam

Three quarters of Muslims regard turning away from Islam as a personal choice, but there are few that applaud that choice. A survey commissioned by television programme Nova indicates that 38 percent of the Muslims questioned disapprove of apostasy. 24 percent say they cut off all contact with a fellow Muslim who has turned their back on Islam. 6 percent is of the opinion that it is acceptable to use violence against an apostate. The survey presented on Tuesday also indicates that 11 percent of Muslims feel that Ehsan Jami’s committee for former Muslims is necessary. A large majority – 66 percent – does not think his committee serves a good purpose.

Controversial Former MP Hirsi Ali Defends Committee for Ex-Muslims

{Some prominent Dutch personalities have recently collided over how to respond to the newly created Committee for Ex-Muslims. Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a former MP and Dutch intellectual, supports the Committee and its chairman Ehsan Jami, also a current MP. For more information about Hirsi Ali and the Committee for ex-Muslims, see the [Netherlands country profile.->http://www.euro-islam.info/spip/article.php3?id_article=294} Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the controversial former Dutch MP who now works for a conservative American think-tank in Washington, has strongly criticised the Labour party for its attitude towards Labour councillor and chairman of the ex-Muslim committee Ehsan Jami. Hirsi Ali, who has the same spokeswoman as Jami, told the Dutch press that the Labour party seems to have more solidarity with intolerant fundamentalists than _freedom fighters’ such as Jami. Hirsi Ali said she supports Jami and condemned the _barbarians’ who attacked him. Jami was placed under police protection last week following an attack by three men believed to be Islamic fundamentalists. Jami has made a number of controversial statements about Islam. Labour leader Wouter Bos has made it clear that his party will not support the ex-Muslim committee and said he was unhappy with the way Jami has chosen to attract attention for problems within the Muslim community.

Ehsan Jami directs committee on for ex-Muslims: Fighting for the freedom not to believe

Ehsan Jami, a municipal council member for Labour in Leidschendam, has joined forces with Loubna Berrada, a member of the Conservative (VVD) Party, to form the Central Committee for ex-Muslims. Jami has given up the life of Islam for one of freedom. He became increasingly disillusioned with his faith after 9/11. Though he has nothing against Muslims generally, he no longer respects Islam because of its role in terrorism, the oppression of women, and the oppression of citizens under tyrannical regimes. The Central Committee for ex-Muslims will primarily work to address the greatest taboo in Islam: saying goodbye to one’s faith. The intolerance of Muslims, he claims, has limited their willingness to accept women and gay rights. The Committee will be active in debating these issues with Muslims, providing information to schools, and advising the government-whether solicited or unsolicited.