Chances for money making during Ramadan

According to Ali Topal, owner of restaurant chain Meram (in Amsterdam and Rotterdam) and Ahmed Ait Moha, researcher at Motivaction, many owners of for example restaurants and shops, do not realize their chances of money making during Ramadan. They don’t realize the needs and wishes of Muslims, for example for restaurants to extend their opening hours. Partly this may be due to a lack of information, but it might also be that owners hesitate to do something ‘only’ for their islamic customers.

Flickr / raasiel
Flickr / raasiel

BBC Current Affairs Programmes failing to address radical Islam

The BBC is failing to address the “awesomely difficult questions” facing Britain, including the economy and the threat of radical Islam, according to the corporation’s former chief.
The BBC is failing to address the “awesomely difficult questions” facing Britain, including the economy and the threat of radical Islam, according to the corporation’s former chief.

The BBC is failing to address the “awesomely difficult questions” facing Britain, including the economy and the threat of radical Islam, according to the corporation’s former chief.

John Birt, director-general of the BBC from 1992-2000, said its current affairs analysis was falling short. He was not referring to Newsnight, which he described as “a programme of the day, about issues of the moment.” But he said he was “talking about a much more strategic need on all the big questions we face. Every economy bar one in the G7 is more productive than the UK – these are the big issues that go undiscussed,” he told a media conference at London’s City University.

Digital journalism is giving people access to more information than before. “What it is not creating is more quality journalism,” Lord Birt said. “We get more knowledge of things happening around the world but pulling it all together and addressing the big policy questions – what should we be doing in respect of radical Islam, the National Health Service – that’s what we’re not doing very well and nobody’s doing very much.”

He added that the BBC must “get back to those very high purposes which are appropriate to a publicly funded broadcaster”.

 

 

Gear wheels network for young well-educated Muslims

August 8

 

In March 2010, young engaged Muslims met to initiate a networks called Zahnräder “gear wheels”.

The network´s aim is to provide a professional networking platform for young well-educated Muslims, who either engage in politics, economy, media or the social sector.

 

Since 2012, the network´s capabilities were boosted when being supported by organizations such as the British Council, the aid organization Islamic Relief, and the education network of North Rhine-Westphalia. Ali Aslan Gümüsay is one of the founders of “gear wheels” and the current board of directors. Gümüsay, is a doctoral candidate at the Said Business School of Oxford University. He underlined the necessity for Muslims to network and participate in German society.  Zahnräder does not require participants to subscribe a membership. So far, there are around 90 active people and a German wide circle of contributors participating at Zahnräder’s online forums and annual national conferences in Germany.

Ofcom fines TV channel DM Digital for broadcasting ‘duty to kill’ speech by Islamic scholar

A television channel has been hit with a hefty fine after broadcasting a speech by an Islamic scholar who said Muslims had “a duty to kill” anyone who insulted the prophet. Communications watchdog Ofcom levied the fine, totalling £105,000, after it found DM Digital had twice breached the broadcasting code. The Manchester-based channel, which says it has a worldwide audience of 30 million, describes itself as bringing “Asian and English cultures closer by integrating its people, the cultural diversity, communities and the economy”.

 

Ofcom’s report cited a programme called Rehmatul Lil Alameen which was broadcast on October 9 2011, and which featured a live lecture which it said was “likely to encourage or incite the commission of crime or to lead to disorder”. It stated some of the scholar’s comments could be seen as “a generic call to all Muslims encouraging or inciting them to criminal action or disorder, by unambiguously stating that they had a duty to kill anyone who criticises or insults the Prophet Mohammed and apostates”. The lecturer also praised the introduction of a blasphemy law in Pakistan and the murder of a prominent politician who opposed it.

 

Ofcom fined the channel £85,000 and ordered them not to repeat the broadcast.

The Fall of Morsi divides Italian Muslim Youth

July 4, 2013

At 11:20 last night the news: Morsi is deposed. A heavy silence descended on Facebook and on phones that until shortly before were ringing. There are no more texts where friends were discussing Morsi, those in favor and those against. Then, little by little, everything seemed to perk up: a friend, Sara Sayed calls me: “Have you seen? The military did it,” while others say “Morsi paid for his errors, and the Egyptian people have done it.” The fall of the Egyptian president, one year after his election, divided the Muslim youth: There are those who weep and rejoice, those who do not know what to say and believe that Morsi was wrong but that a military government is absolutely unacceptable: a babel of opinions, thoughts and considerations which is part of the discussions of young Muslims in Italy.

“Morsi has done nothing for Egypt” says Sami Samarli “he made senseless speeches, instead Morsi had to propose solutions for the country.”

Sara Andil replied “The Egyptian economy was recovering and then after thirty years of dictatorship, Egypt was destroyed economically, as if they could think to fix everything in one year? Morsi needed more time.”

The clash between the different positions, however, is not limited to only the economy but it is also general: between those who support the Muslim Brotherhood and those who do not. Omar Afifi on this is clear “Morsi divided the country.”

“The Muslim Brotherhood has not been able to govern”

Khaled Al Sadat echoed this when he said “one must intervene if a task is not completed” and hopes that “God gives the best to Egypt.”

 

Karim El Sayed does not agree: “Morsi is still the president of all Egyptians, democratically elected therefore a military coup is unacceptable.”

“It’s true” he says “Mosaab Hamada Morsi has made big mistakes.” Omar Kudsi plays down everything with a bitter joke: “Just to remind you: Egypt – 2 Syria – 0”

Online protest over Maldives’ rape sentence

The Maldives is a highly popular destination for British tourists. But its reputation is being questioned after a teenage rape victim was sentenced to 100 lashes for engaging in premarital sex. Justice campaigners are targeting the country’s lucrative tourism industry unless it improves women’s’ rights. The charges against the girl were brought by police who said she confessed to engaging in sexual activity outside of marriage. A confession was made during an investigation by officials into separate accusations that her stepfather had raped her and killed their baby. The girl is thought to have been abused by local men for some time and her mother is also alleged to have concealed the crime. The flogging sentence prompted outrage from human rights groups which condemned the punishment as “cruel, degrading and inhumane”.  Around 35 per cent of the Maldives’ economy is directly linked to tourism with around 100,000 Britons traveling to the Maldives each year, making the UK its third-largest market for tourism.

 

General US Election Preferences by Religious Group

With voters continuing to focus on economic issues, Barack Obama holds a slim 49% to 45% advantage over Mitt Romney in the latest polling by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press. However, Romney holds a 53-point lead over Obama among white evangelicals and a 20-point lead among white Catholics. Obama’s strongest support among religious groups comes from black Protestants (96% of whom support Obama) and the religiously unaffiliated (who favor Obama over Romney by 67% to 26%).

The poll also shows that more than eight-in-ten voters cite the economy and jobs as very important issues in deciding who to vote for this fall, and roughly three-quarters cite the federal budget deficit, health care and education. Far fewer rate hot-button social issues such as gay marriage, birth control and abortion as top voting priorities.

2012 Campaign Dynamics

Obama’s lead over Romney has narrowed since last month, when he had a 12-point advantage, though it is comparable to margins from earlier this year. While Obama’s advantage has declined since March, there is little to suggest a specific problem or campaign event as having a critical effect.

While there have been debates over issues related to gender, the rise and fall in Obama’s support has largely crossed gender lines, with a fairly consistent gender gap over time. For example, since March, Obama’s support among both men and women has slipped five percentage points.

Independent voters remain up for grabs. In the current survey, 48% favor Romney while 42% back Obama. A month ago, it was 47% Obama, 44% Romney.

Public Priorities: Deficit Rising, Terrorism Slipping

Economic issues continue to be the public’s highest priority as the 2012 State of the Union approaches. Fully 86% say that strengthening the economy should be a top priority for the president and Congress this year, and 82% rate improving the job situation as a top priority.

The annual policy priorities survey by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, conducted Jan. 11-16 among 1,502 adults, finds that the federal budget deficit stands out as the fastest growing policy priority for Americans, largely because of increasing Republican concerns about the issue. Fully 69% rate reducing the budget deficit as a top priority — the most in any of the Pew Research Center’s annual policy priority updates going back to 1994.

Sarah Palin: North Korean Missile Launch A Reminder To Work On ‘Energy Independence’ and Obama’s appeasement to Muslim World.

The death of North Korea tyrant Kim Jong Il has elicited a variety of responses from political figures on this hemisphere. Tonight on Follow the Money, Sarah Palin weighed in on both the death of the dictator and the missile launch shortly after in North Korea, and told host Eric Bolling she saw the danger as a reminder that America must focus on being secure, which means “energy independence” and “solvency with our economy.”

She also noted the short-range missile recently fired under the new leadership of the young and seemingly equally-unstable Kim Jong Un, describing it as “a firing shot across the bow to show the rest of the world that ‘we’re still here.’” To Palin, this was a reminder to be “wise in our foreign policy decisions,” and to take steps “for America to be secure, and that comes back to energy independence, that comes back to solvency with our economy… to make sure that we’re not reliant on other countries.” She concluded that America must make sure to continue “sweeping our own porch.”

These last comments concerned Bolling in light of the leadership of President Obama, “who has been apologetic towards the Muslim world,” particularly with Iran. “If [Kim Jong Un] is playing war games the first day in office,” Bolling argued, that was not a good sign, and “maybe it’s time to get a tougher president.” Palin replied in the affirmative, making the argument that the President had said as a candidate that he was open to talks with rogue nations, and that should have been a sign then that his policies would be what they are.

Group that counts Islam among US’s ills to gather in Detroit, home to large Muslim community

DETROIT — A group that counts Islam among the ills facing the nation began a 24-hour prayer rally Friday evening in an area with one of the largest Muslim communities in the United States.

The gathering at Ford Field, the stadium where the Detroit Lions play, is designed to tackle issues such as the economy, racial strife, same-sex relationships and abortion. But the decade-old organization known as TheCall has said Detroit is a “microcosm of our national crisis” in all areas, including “the rising tide of the Islamic movement.”

Leaders of TheCall believe a satanic spirit is shaping all parts of U.S. society, and it must be challenged through intensive Christian prayer and fasting. Such a demonic spirit has taken hold of specific areas, Detroit among them, organizers say. In the months ahead of their rallies, teams of local organizers often travel their communities performing a ritual called “divorcing Baal,” the name of a demon spirit, to drive out the devil from each location.