Anonymous Hacks English Defence League, Publishes Member Information

29 May 2013

 

Anonymous, the shadowy global network of computer hackers, has carried out a cyber attack on the English Defence League (EDL) and released member information including names, addresses, and phone numbers. A YouTube video created by the group claimed that the attack was in response to a number of far-right groups, including the EDL, seizing on the Woolwich attack to further their campaigns of “hate, bigotry, and misinformation.”

 

The video, posted by member IWill Object and entitled “A Message from Anonymous UK to the English Defence League,” warns of future cyber attacks and threatens the EDL with “the systematic and comprehensive decimation of your cult.”

 

The personal details of EDL members and donors were published online on Tuesday. At least one EDL member has since received threats via calls by “anti-fascists and Muslims” to his mobile phone number since the information was released. The EDL has been particularly vocal in its condemnation of the Woolwich attack, condemnation which it has directed principally towards the Muslim community. The group organized a number of rallies last week, including a high-profile march to Downing Street on Monday which attracted more than 1,000 protestors.

 

UK Muslim mob threatens to fly black flag of Islam over Downing Street for jailed cleric’s release

16 November 2010

Muslim radicals have vowed to fly the black flag of Islam above Downing Street, the official residence of the British Prime Minister, and the White House, the official residence of the US President, in protest over the imprisonment of cleric Omar Bakri Mohammed in Lebanon.
Omar Bakri Mohammed is currently serving a life sentence for training and fundraising for al-Qaida. Bakri has been banned from Britain since 2006. The Daily Express quoted Abu Saalihah, a student of Bakri’s, as saying: “We will not rest until the black flag of Islam is flown over the White House and 10 Downing Street.” The demonstration took place outside the Lebanese embassy in London.

British Muslims support ban on radical Islamic cleric

The British Muslims have supported the UK Government’s decision to ban radical Islamic preacher Zakir Naik from entering the country and said his preaching was contrary to the concepts of Islam which is a religion of peace and harmony. In this regard, a delegation consisting of leaders from various Islamic sects delivered a petition at the Downing Street voicing their concerns at Naik’s negative influence on followers particularly Muslim youth and the inaccurate knowledge those interested in learning more about the faith were receiving from his speeches.

Baroness Warsi becomes first Muslim woman in British Cabinet

Britain’s first female Muslim Cabinet minister said on Thursday it was “humbling” to join the government, after taking part in new Prime Minister David Cameron’s first full ministerial meeting. Sayeeda Warsi is the Conservative Party’s chairwoman and minister without portfolio in Cameron’s new coalition government.

“For anybody to serve in government is a privilege,” said the 39-year-old of Pakistani origin, after Cameron held his first Cabinet meeting in 10 Downing Street. “But to be born the daughter of an immigrant mill-worker in a mill town in Yorkshire, to have the privilege of serving in Cabinet at such an important time in Britain’s history I think is terribly humbling,” she told the BBC.

Baroness Warsi is one of the extremely few exceptions of the predominantly male and white Cabinet.

Islamic fanatics are openly using the internet to recruit children in Britain, says Civitas

Islamic extremists in Britain are openly trying to recruit children via the internet, a report warns. They are using websites which carry messages of hate from terror suspects, according to the respected Civitas think-tank. The study, by its Centre for Social Cohesion, reveals how fanatics are using the Web to bypass the anti-terror laws passed in the wake of the 2005 London bombings. Extremists are no longer delivering hate-filled sermons and distributing propaganda on street corners, but instead use pro-jihadist websites. Some of these carry calls for the flag of Islam to ‘fly over Downing Street’, and urge militants to attack Jews and Christians. Most worrying are sections of the sites dedicated to the radicalisation of children. One message from controversial preacher Omar Bakri – now exiled to Lebanon – says children should be brought up to spread Islam through jihad. Mothers are also using the websites to rail against British education. One writes: ‘As part of GCSE, they must study Shakespeare, whose books are full of homosexuality, fornication and adultery, each of which are great sins in Islam.’ The websites also routinely carry rants by fanatics such as Abu Hamza, Abdullah el-Faisal, Abu Izzadeen and Abu Qatada. James Slack reports.

Top Police Chief: We must start Negotiating with Al-Qaeda Now to Stop Terror

A police chief was slapped down by the Government yesterday for suggesting Britain could open talks with Al Qaeda. Sir Hugh Orde, head of the Police Service of Northern Ireland, said he knew of no terror campaign that had not ended with negotiation. And he said his 30 years spent tackling the IRA had convinced him that security work and arrests were not enough to defeat terrorists. But his suggestion was immediately dismissed by the Foreign Office. A spokesman said: ‘It is inconceivable that Her Majesty’s Government would ever seek to reach a mutually acceptable accommodation with a terrorist organisation like Al Qaeda.’ Jonathan Powell, ex-chief of staff at Downing Street, also says the Ulster peace deal shows talking to terror groups can work. He said negotiating with Al Qaeda might seem pointless now, but a political solution would be needed in the end. Sir Hugh, a leading contender to take over from Sir Ian Blair as chief of the Metropolitan Police, said: ‘If you want my professional assessment of any terrorism campaign, what fixes it is talking and engaging and judging when the conditions are right for that to take place.’

Tony Blair to call on faith leaders to ‘awaken the world’s conscience’

Tony Blair will today spell out why he believes faith and young people can solve the problems of the world and will call on religious leaders to work together to “awaken the world’s conscience. In his first major speech in the UK since leaving Downing Street last year, the former Prime Minister will address the whole area of faith in a global context, a subject about which he is passionate. Mr Blair is expected to be greeted by anti-Iraq war protesters when he speaks this evening at Westminster Cathedral, the UK’s Roman Catholic flagship and Mr Blair’s spiritual home for his time in London as Prime Minister. The cathedral has attained even more significance since his conversion to Roman Catholicism shortly before Christmas last year. Mr Blair, a Middle East peace envoy, will use the speech to flag up the work of his new Tony Blair Faith Foundation which he will launch officially next month. He has high earning capacity as a popular and charismatic speaker. Earlier this year he earned $300,000 for a speech to the banking giant Goldman Sachs in Florida, and last year he earned _240,000 in Dongguan, southern China. Ruth Gledhill reports.

Britain’s blasphemy law no longer sacred

After a teddy bear incident and much debate, the House of Lords votes to abolish it: A funny thing happened in November when Britain launched a righteous protest over Sudan’s arrest of a British schoolteacher accused of insulting Islam by letting her students name a class teddy bear Muhammad. The Sudanese ambassador was summoned; Prime Minister Gordon Brown issued a protest. But it didn’t take long for someone to point out that Downing Street was standing on diplomatic quicksand: Britain itself has a law making blasphemy a crime. Kim Murphy reports.

Archbishop of Canterbury tries to defuse row over sharia law but refuses to apologize

The Archbishop of Canterbury has sought to defuse the bitter row over what he appeared to claim was the unavoidable adoption of sharia law in the UK by conceding that his controversial comments may have been unclear and “clumsily deployed”. Whilst taking full responsibility for his part in the highly damaging episode, which resulted in calls for him to resign and sparked a disagreement with Downing Street, Dr Rowan Williams fell short of offering a full-blown apology and refused to back down. Instead he insisted that the Church of England had a “considerable” responsibility to other faith groups and asserted that it was not “inappropriate” to raise issues surrounding Islam or other religions – comments that were immediately welcomed by Muslim leaders. Departing from his intended remarks at the opening of the General Synod in London yesterday, Dr Williams said: “I must of course take responsibility for any unclarity either in that text or in the radio interview and for any misleading use of words that has helped to cause distress or misunderstanding among the public at large or especially my fellow Christians.” Jonathan Brown reports.

Williams tries to defuse row over sharia law but refuses to apologise

The Archbishop of Canterbury has sought to defuse the bitter row over what he appeared to claim was the unavoidable adoption of sharia law in the UK by conceding that his controversial comments may have been unclear and ” clumsily deployed”. Whilst taking full responsibility for his part in the highly damaging episode, which resulted in calls for him to resign and sparked a disagreement with Downing Street, Dr Rowan Williams fell short of offering a full-blown apology and refused to back down. Instead he insisted that the Church of England had a “considerable” responsibility to other faith groups and asserted that it was not “inappropriate” to raise issues surrounding Islam or other religions – comments that were immediately welcomed by Muslim leaders.