Denmark: Muslims Accuse Danish Tv Of Incitement To Religious Hatred

COPENHAGEN – A group of Muslims has reported a Danish broadcaster to the police for repeatedly airing a controversial film about Muslim oppression of women, Danish media reported on Sunday. Some 20 Muslims are pressing charges against Danish public broadcaster Danmarks Radio (DR) for airing recently-murdered Dutch filmmaker Theo Van Gogh’s film Submission in its entirety, as well as for repeatedly showing clips from the film in newscasts.

Headscarves In The Headlines

France is not the only country where headscarves have proved contentious. A number of countries already ban the garment from schools and other public buildings, while elsewhere it is the failure of women to don a veil which prompts outrage.

Singapore
Singapore, keen to avoid racial and religious tensions between its ethnic Chinese majority and the Malay Muslim minority, has banned the scarf from schools. The Singapore government believes the ban is necessary to promote racial harmony, but Muslims say it infringes upon their religious freedoms.

Germany
The issue has come to a head in recent months after Germany’s supreme court ruled that a school was wrong to exclude a Muslim teacher because she wore a headscarf. The judges declared that current legislation did not allow for such a decision, but added that individual states would be within their rights to make legal provisions to this effect.

France The French parliament is widely expected to approve legislation banning overt religious symbols – including headscarves – from schools. President Jacques Chirac believes such a ban is necessary to preserve the secularity of the French state.

Saudi Arabia
Saudi Arabia’s highest religious authority recently warned of “”grave consequences”” if women continued to appear unveiled.

Turkey
For the past 80 years Turks have lived in a secular state founded by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who rejected headscarves as backward looking in his campaign to secularise Turkish society. Scarves are consequently banned in civic spaces in the country.

Belgium
Two politicians, inspired by developments in neighbouring France, are hoping to push legislation through parliament that would ban the headscarf from state schools.

Russia
Muslim women last year won the right to wear the headscarf for identification photos, which was banned in Russia in 1997.

Denmark
A Muslim woman last year lost a high-profile court case against a large supermarket chain in Denmark after she had been fired for wearing a headscarf at work in 2001. The court ruled that her contract contained a dress code banning headgear.”

Denmark: Danes Restrict Imams To Stifle Muslim Radicals

By Julian Isherwood, Scandinavia Correspondent Denmark will crack down on the immigration of Islamic preachers to try to stifle radicalism among its Muslims. A parliamentary bill does not mention the Islamic faith, but Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the Danish prime minister, has made the target of the legislation clear in announcing restrictions on “foreign missionaries”. The bill is expected to be passed by parliament within weeks. To cater for the Danish constitution, which bans any form of religious discrimination, the legislation will affect all religious persuasions. About 30 organisations under the banner of the Danish Missionary Society reacted strongly to the proposals yesterday, saying the government was “stifling the freedom of religion and thought”. The new laws are expected to curtail seriously the activities of some imams, who have been at the centre of controversy for making statements alleged to be anti-Semitic, or against current legislation.

European Muslims and the Secular State in a Comparative Perspective

Sorbonne: Salle Louis Liard 17 rue de la Sorbonne, 75005 Paris

European Muslims and the Secular State in a Comparative Perspective

NOCRIME CONFERENCE – Organized with the Sponsorship of the European Commission (DG Research)

MONDAY, JUNE 30, 2003

I. Modes of Interaction in Non-Muslim Societies

President Patrick Michel CNRS/CERI, EHESS, France

Discussant: Tuula Sakaranaho University of Helsinki, Finland

  • Jonas Otterbeck Silence and Speech in the Muslim Groups in Sweden Malmö University, Sweden
  • Lars Dencik Jewish Life in Sweden Roskilde University, Denmark
  • Philip Lewis Beyond Victimhood – from the Global to the Local: a British Case Study Bradford University, UK
  • II. Muslim Leadership and Institutional Constraints in Europe

    President Jean-Paul Willaime EPHE, Director of GSRL (CNRS-EPHE), France

    Discussant: Martin Van Bruinessen ISIM, Utrecht University, The Netherlands

  • Séan McLoughlin Islam, Citizenship and Civil Society: New Muslim Leaderships in the UK Leeds University, UK
  • Valérie Amiraux Building Religious Authorities among Muslims in Europe: Some Case Studies from Germany and France CURAPP-CNRS, France
  • Nico Landman New Policies on Foreign Imams in the Netherlands Utrecht University, The Netherlands
  • TUESDAY, JULY 1, 2003

    III. Religious Authorities in the Global Era: Ethnicity and Diasporas

    President Sami Zemni University of Ghent, Belgium

    Discussant: Jonathan Friedman EHESS, France

  • Jocelyne Cesari Muslim Leadership in Europe: What Connections with the Umma? GSRL-CNRS, Harvard University, NOCRIME coordinator, France/USA
  • Sébastien Fath Transnational Dimension of Evangelical Movements CNRS/GSRL, France
  • Yngve Lithman, Transnational Radicalism and Muslim Diasporas University of Bergen, Norway
  • Garbi Schmidt Formation of Transnational Identities among Young Muslims in Denmark Danish National Institute of Social Research, Denmark
  • IV. Islam and European Urban Life

    President: Tariq Ramadan University of Fribourg, Switzerland

    Discussant: Jose Casanova New School University, USA

  • Chantal Saint-Blancat/Ottavia Schmidt di Friedberg Visibility of Muslims in Italy and Communication Issues University of Padova, University of Trieste, Italy
  • Gema Martin-Munoz Mapping the Muslim Leadership in Spanish Urban Centers (Madrid and Barcelona) Autonoma University of Madrid, Spain
  • Dilwar Hussain Muslims in British Cities: Are they Different from Other Migrants? The Islamic Foundation, UK