Local Community shares concerns about delay in labeling the Finsbury Park Attack as Terrorism

Finsbury Park area residents were frustrated that the police and media took several hours to start calling the Finsbury Park attack a terrorist attack. One person died in the attack and 10 people were injured.

Emma Salem, a 15-year-old resident, said, “I feel like if it was a Muslim man, whether or not they know who it is or whatever, it’s straight away classed as a terrorist attack. But because this was a white man I feel like the media especially try and cover it up. ”

Some of the anger was based on misleading information, as viral social media comparisons between headlines between Finsbury Park and certain Muslim-perpetrated terrorist attacks did not take the timing of headlines into account.

The media also focused on an alleged history of Islamist extremism in Finsbury Park. This also angered residents, as any such past problem is largely seen to have been actively and successfully resolved.

Religious Groups’ Views on End-of-Life Issues

November 21, 2013

 

In the following summaries, religious leaders, scholars and ethicists from 16 major American religious groups explain how their faith traditions’ teachings address physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia and other end-of-life questions. (For an in-depth look at public opinion on end-of-life issues, see “Views on End-of-Life Medical Treatments.” And for an overview of the political, legal and ethical dimensions of the end-of-life debate, see “To End Our Days.”)

Assemblies of God

The Assemblies of God, the largest Pentecostal denomination in the United States, opposes physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. The denomination teaches that life is a sacred gift and that only God should determine when life ends. “We simply feel that it is not our prerogative to end life,” says Edgar R. Lee, chairman of the church’s Commission on Doctrinal Purity. “God is the giver of life, not us.”

At the same time, the church allows that life need not be sustained at all costs when there is no hope for recovery. “We leave room for people to [reject] artificial means of life support,” Lee says. Indeed, he adds, the church “does not frown on” the use of pain medication to alleviate suffering, “even in cases where it might contribute to hastening death.”

Islam

Islamic teachings oppose physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. “Muslims believe that life is sacred and comes from God; therefore it is a sin to take life,” says David Stephen Powers, a professor of Near Eastern studies at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y.

Islam also teaches that God alone decides how long someone will live and when they will die, according to Ayman Shabana, a visiting fellow at the Islamic Legal Studies Program at Harvard Law School in Cambridge, Mass. “There is this reluctance … to make any kind of decisions that would end life prematurely because it is believed that [these decisions] are solely in the hands of God,” Shabana says.

Islam’s views on such issues as assisted suicide and euthanasia also are influenced by the belief that suffering and other difficulties might be beneficial, Shabana says. “There is this notion that you don’t always know what’s good for you,” he says, “so it may be right that you should go through some kind of difficulty that tests your faith.” Indeed, Shabana says, “in the Islamic tradition, end-of-life suffering is seen as a way to purify previous sins so that by the time you meet God, you do so in a [more pure] state.”

While Islamic thinkers oppose hastening death, they also generally believe that the terminally ill need not employ extraordinary means and technologies to delay dying. “We are basically talking about the difference between a conscious decision to end life, which is wrong, and life ending by itself,” Shabana says, adding that the line between the two is not always clearly defined.

For more information:

Aramesh, K., and Shadi, H. 2007. “Euthanasia: An Islamic Ethical Perspective.” Iranian Journal of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, volume 6, supplement 5, pages 35-38.

 

PEW.com: http://www.pewforum.org/2013/11/21/religious-groups-views-on-end-of-life-issues/

Hofstad Group Member to be Released from Prison

30 August 2013

 

Samir Azzouz, serving a nine year sentence for terrorism in Rotterdam, is to be released on 6 September. He will have served two thirds of the sentence. Azzouz was a member of the “Hofstad Group”, and was jailed for preparing attacks on targets including politicians and the head office of the AIVD secret service.

The Public Prosecutor requested a one year delay in Azzouz’s release, on the basis of poor behavior in prison and continued “radical Islamic convictions.” Azzouz was re-arrested in his cell in 2012 under suspicion of planning another attack. The judge rejected the request due to a lack of plan from the Public Prosecutor proving how the danger of repetition would be reduced by an extension of Azzouz’s time in prison.

Appeals court delays Gitmo genital search ban

WASHINGTON — A federal appeals court is allowing the U.S. government to continue genital searches of Guantanamo Bay detainees — at least temporarily.

A three-judge panel of the court Wednesday granted the Obama administration’s emergency motion for a temporary delay in enforcing U.S. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth’s order banning the practice.

Detainee lawyers say the searches began after prisoners were told they would have to travel from their resident camp to another site at the base to meet with or talk on the telephone with their lawyers. The lawyers say some detainees had refused to make the trip because of the new searches.

In court papers, the government argued that Lamberth’s order would weaken security at the U.S. Navy base in Cuba by making it harder to prevent smuggling of contraband. And it said that the ruling went where no other court has gone before.

“For the first time to the government’s knowledge, a federal court has restricted a military commander from implementing routine security procedures at a detention facility holding enemy forces, notwithstanding the universally recognized need for the maintenance of discipline and order in those facilities,” the government wrote in its motion with the appeals court.

Military judge rules not to delay Fort Hood shooting suspect’s trial, set to begin Aug. 20

FORT HOOD, Texas — A military judge ruled Friday against delaying the trial of the Fort Hood shooting suspect, an Army psychiatrist who remains banned from the courtroom because his beard violates Army regulations.

Maj. Nidal Hasan’s trial will proceed as scheduled, beginning on Aug. 20. Defense attorneys wanted the trial moved to December, saying they needed more time to prepare.

But the judge, Col. Gregory Gross, said the defense already had plenty of time. Prosecutors had indicated they were ready for trial last fall, but the court-martial was set for March and postponed first to June and then August — all at the request of the defense team.

New York Times Says Running Pam Geller’s Anti-Islam Ad Could Put Lives In Danger

The New York Times found itself at the center of a controversy on Thursday over its refusal to immediately run an anti-Islam ad.

Fox News and the Daily Caller ran stories questioning whether the Times’ decision to indefinitely delay publishing ad was a sign the paper had a religious double-standard.

The articles note that the Times previously ran an anti-Catholic ad that, among other things, said faith in the religion was misplaced, “after two decades of sex scandals involving preying priests, church complicity, collusion and cover-up going all the way to the top.”

But when Stop Islamization of America director Pamela Geller asked to run a paid advertisement with a similar style and anti-Islam message, the Times refused, at least for now, telling Geller that “the fallout from running this ad now could put U.S. troops and/or civilians in the [Afghan] region in danger.”

But the Times didn’t shut the door to running the ad altogether.

Geller told the Daily Caller she doubts the Times will ever run the ad because, in her words, “when is it ever a good time to blaspheme under the Sharia?”

Mediaite isn’t buying the Times’ argument either.

“The bottom line is that both ads are terrible, and justifying that it’s safer to bash one religion over another is a tactless approach on the Times’s part,” Mediaite wrote.

Cologne’s New Central Mosque on the News Again

28./ 29.10.2011

The construction and architecture of the new Central Mosque in Cologne has yet again led to some controversial debate (previously reported in July 2011); yet, this time the argument is between the German Muslim organization DITIB, which is responsible for the construction of the mosque, and its architect, Paul Böhm. During a press conference last Thursday, DITIB representatives criticized Böhm’s work and accused him of not having fulfilled his responsibilities properly. Official construction experts had found more than 2,000 faults in the preliminary building work, which may now effectively double the costs of the construction. As a consequence, DITIB fired the architect, who rejects DITIB’s accusations and is hoping to find a compromise to complete the mosque’s construction. To settle the argument and clarify responsibilities for the construction deficits, the building process might have to be stopped, which would lead to another delay in the completion of the mosque.

Man accused in soldier’s death granted trial delay

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — A judge has granted a delay in the murder trial of Abdulhakim (ahb-DOOL’ hah-KEEM’) Muhammad, the man who says his impulse to avenge the death of Muslims at American hands led him to kill a soldier at a Little Rock military recruiting center.

Tackling Islamophobia

5 December 2010
In this op-ed, Robert Lambert calls on the long-overdue proper debate on anti-Muslim violence and intimidation:
“The new all-party parliamentary group investigating Islamophobia will need to encourage the coalition government to tackle anti-Muslim violence and intimidation as a matter of urgency. Too many victims have suffered in silence and without remedy since the phenomenon became widespread after 9/11 to allow even a day’s delay.
The violence – ranging from murder, grievous bodily harm, petrol bombings, political violence through to death threats and vandalism – has remained largely hidden and unremarked outside of the communities where it occurs for the best part of a decade.
What motivates the violence? Just as a minority of journalists feel licensed to denigrate Muslims in a way they would not dream of doing to any other faith or ethnic minority community so too a minority of gangs and individuals commit violence against Muslims and their places of worship and congregation in the mistaken but often honestly held belief that they are attacking ‘Muslim terrorists’ or ‘extremists’. Invariably this motivation can be traced back to influential media commentators and politicians – not solely to the British National Party and the English Defence League. (…)”

National Front called to remove its “Anti-Islamism” posters

The National Front has been ordered to remove its “No to Islamism” posters distributed by the youth movement of the French political party because they were deemed “provocative of a sentiment of rejection and animosity” and aimed at “youth who are easily influenced”. The National Front must remove all traces of the posters within 24 hours of the judgment, with a fine of 500 Euros per day of delay.