Bomb Suspect Is Charged and Will Be Tried in Civilian Court

BOSTON — The surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing was charged Monday with “using a weapon of mass destruction” that resulted in three deaths, according to documents filed in federal court.

The suspect, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was charged by federal prosectors as he lay in a bed at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, officials said.

In a criminal complaint unsealed Monday in United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts, Mr. Tsarnaev was charged with one count of “using and conspiring to use a weapon of mass destruction” against persons and property within the United States resulting in death, and one count of “malicious destruction of property by means of an explosive device resulting in death.”

If he is convicted, the charges could carry the death penalty.

The charges were announced one week after the 117th Boston Marathon began with a starter’s gun and ended in two deadly bombings, shortly before a statewide moment of silence was planned for 2:50 p.m. to mark the moment a pair of pressure-cooker bombs detonated.

The White House said that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev would not be tried as an enemy combatant. “We will prosecute this terrorist through our civilian system of justice,” said Jay Carney, the White House press secretary.

Mr. Carney noted that it was illegal to try an American citizen in a military commission, and that a number of high-profile terrorism cases were handled in the civilian court system, including that of the would-be bomber who tried to bring down a passenger jet around Christmas 2009 with explosives in his underwear.

Mr. Carney said the government had gotten “valuable intelligence” from suspects kept in the civilian judicial process. “The system has repeatedly proven it can handle” such cases, he said.

“Gay Muslims are Muslims too”

11/10/2010

Rue 89

Tareq Oubrou, the imam of Bordeaux, opposes homophobia and the state sanctioned persecution of homosexuals in Muslim majority states. The imam wants to disassociate Islam with homophobia and anti-semetism by calling for more tolerance towards homosexuals in general, as well as homosexual Muslims.

Oubrou states that the practice of homosexuality isn’t approved by the Quran but gay Muslims are still Muslims in their own right. He argues that the seven Muslim majority states the practice of homosexuality with the death penalty base their jurisdiction upon unverified hadiths.

Judge adjourns weeklong hearing in Sept. 11 case at Guantanamo without ruling on major issues

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba — A weeklong hearing into the legal framework for the Sept. 11 terrorism military tribunal came to an end Friday without a ruling on the most significant motions but progress on some issues that must be resolved before the eventual trial.

After hours of often arcane debate at the U.S. base in Cuba, the military judge presiding over the case deferred most decisions until later. Notable among them were proposed rules for handling classified evidence that prosecutors said are necessary to protect national security and defense lawyers argued are overly broad and restrictive.

Army Col. James Pohl heard arguments on nearly 20 motions and did resolve some matters, including issuing a ruling that the five men charged with planning and aiding the Sept. 11 attacks may sit out their pretrial hearings. While the extent of the progress was in dispute, both the chief prosecutor and defense lawyers agreed the case was unlikely to be ready for trial in 2013.

The five defendants facing charges that include terrorism and murder include Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, a self-styled terrorist mastermind who grew up in Kuwait and attended college in North Carolina. He condemned the U.S. in a lecture to the court on Wednesday as he wore a camouflage vest that had been approved by the judge.

The judge heard lengthy arguments on a motion from the defense asking the judge to decide that the constitutional rights recognized in civilian criminal trials will apply in the special tribunals for war-time offenses. Prosecutors argued it was too soon to make that determination and the judge deferred a ruling.

Most of the arguments centered on the proposed security rules, including provisions that the defense said will prevent the five prisoners from publicly disclosing what happened to them while detained in secret CIA prisons overseas. The U.S. government says they were subjected to “enhanced interrogation”; critics say it was torture.

Lawyers for the defendants said the proposed rules would prevent them from using what happened in the CIA prisons to challenge statements the men made to authorities or to argue that they shouldn’t get the death penalty. It would also prevent the public from learning details about the harsh interrogations.

Guantanamo prisoners charged in Sept. 11 attacks seek court recess on Fridays, during Ramadan

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Lawyers for five Guantanamo Bay prisoners charged in the Sept. 11 attacks are asking a military court to put their legal proceedings on hold during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

The lawyers also ask that no court sessions be held on Fridays, when many devout Muslims seek not to work.

Defense lawyers argue in court motions unsealed Friday that the court has an obligation to respect the men’s faith and their need to fast and pray during Ramadan, which comes in late summer this year.

Prosecutors say any blanket restriction would make it too difficult to schedule hearings.

The five defendants include the self-proclaimed mastermind of the attacks, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed. They face the death penalty if convicted. Their next hearings are scheduled to start Aug. 8, during Ramadan.

No Charges for al-Haddad’s Comments in Amsterdam

22 June 2012

 

The public prosecution of Amsterdam will not bring chartes against Haitham al-Haddad for comments made during a debate in the city this spring. The event replaced a symposium at the city’s Vrij Universiteit, cancelled following commotion over al-Haddad’s presence. Anti-Islam campaigner Ehsan Jami called for legal action against al-Haddad, a British-Palestinian expert and controversial figure. Jami’s accusations were based on Al-Haddad’s comment that Sharia law prescribes the death penalty for ex-Muslims. The Amsterdam public prosecution declined to charge al-Haddad, stating that he had not committed any offenses because the conditions which he outlined for applying the death penalty clearly could not occur in the Netherlands.

Partner of alleged Canadian terrorist grapples with competing realities

The Globe and Mail – February 7, 2012

Sayfildin (Sayf) Tahir Sharif, 39, is the contractor who Ms. Rain, a first nations woman, quickly fell in love with after they met in the summer of 2009. She converted to Islam to be with the man, an Iraqi Kurd who was granted Canadian citizenship in 2005. He became a father figure to her four children.

The picket-fence image is at odds with the portrait of Faruq Khalil Muhammad ‘Isa, a man the U.S. Department of Justice alleges is a terrorist. The Justice Department alleges that a few months before meeting Ms. Rain, Mr. Sharif helped co-ordinate a suicide bombing attack in Iraq that killed five American soldiers; that he pledged his support for a war on America “1,000,000 per cent;” that he sent terrorists money.

Mr. Sharif has sat in an Edmonton jail since his arrest a year ago as the United States attempts to have him extradited to face seven terrorism-related charges in New York state. On Jan. 30, his extradition hearing was delayed until May. If he’s indeed sent south, an overwhelming likelihood in such cases, he’ll spend his life in prison if found guilty – or, potentially, without a trial.Canada doesn’t extradite people if they’ll face the death penalty. Indefinite detention, however, is new ground.

Five Muslim Men on Trial for Distributing Homophobic Leaflets

10./ 11.01.2012

Last week, five Muslim men have gone on trial accused of having distributed leaflets calling for gay people to be executed. The Derby Crown Court heard that the group of five had allegedly handed out leaflets demanding the death penalty for homosexuality after Friday prayers at a Derby mosque and put them through people’s letterboxes in the local neighbourhood in July 2010, in the run up to the Gay Pride event. By handing out anti-gay death sentence flyers, the five men are accused of stirring up hatred on the grounds of sexual orientation, which is a breach of the new hate laws that came into force in March 2010. This prosecution is the first of its kind since the legislation came into force. The trial continues. All five men deny the charges; if they are convicted, however, they face a maximum sentence of seven years in jail and/ or an unlimited fine.

Army psychiatrist charged in Fort Hood rampage will have military trial, face death penalty

FORT WORTH, Texas — The Army psychiatrist charged in the worst mass shooting on a U.S. military installation will be tried in a military court and face the death penalty if convicted, Fort Hood’s commanding general announced Wednesday.

Maj. Nidal Hasan is charged with 13 counts of premeditated murder and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder in the November 2009 shooting spree on the Texas Army post.

Radical Preacher Bilal Philips Asked to Leave After Giving Speech in Germany

21 April 2011

German security forces expelled radical Islamist preacher Bilal Philips from Germany. Philips participated in a rally, “Islam – the misunderstood religion”, organised by Salafists in Frankfurt and gave a speech together with his German radical counterpart Pierre Vogel. The Interior Ministry was not aware of when or where Philips had entered Germany, and he was asked to leave within three days.

The rally had been cancelled at first and was only permitted at the last minute with 16 requirements, including a prohibition to force gender segregation upon the audience – although the event turned out to be segregated in the end. Philips and Vogel adhered to keeping to a peaceful rally without inciting hatred or issuing any condescending or discriminatory remarks about people of different faith, knowing that they were closely watched. In the past, Philips has called for the death penalty for homosexuals, which he did not repeat at this occasion, however he underlined that homosexuality was a sin, but that he did not hate these people. Salafist groups have been increasingly monitored after the Frankfurt attack in March, in which two US soldiers were killed by a radicalised Islamist who had previously had contacts with Salafists in Frankfurt.

Indian Islamic Teacher Barred from Canada

An Indian Muslim televangelist who was banned from Britain for “unacceptable behavior” will not be allowed into Canada to speak at an upcoming conference in Toronto. Dr. Zakir Naik, who has said “every Muslim should be a terrorist” and that Jews are “our staunchest enemy,” was to headline next month’s Journey of Faith Conference — which is billed as one of North America’s largest Islamic conferences and is expected to attract upward of 10,000 people.

The 44-year-old medical doctor recommends capital punishment for homosexuals and the death penalty for those who abandon Islam as their faith. He has said that a man is within his right to beat his wife “lightly,” although in a July 2009 YouTube video he cautioned against hitting her on the face or leaving a mark. The “Keep Zakir Naik Out of Canada” Facebook group, which was launched over the weekend, also points out his view that Western women make themselves “more susceptible to rape” by wearing revealing clothing.

According to the Journey of Faith event website, the “hope” of the July 2-4 2010 conference at the downtown Metro Toronto Convention Centre is for Muslims to “renew their forgotten relationship” with the Koran.