Radicalization Among Young Muslims in Aarhus

The recently established Centre for Studies in Islamism and Radicalization has published its first research report entitled “Radicalization among Young Muslims in Aarhus”.

The new research report investigates the results of applying the Danish authorities’ definition of radicalization to existing Danish Muslim environments in Denmark, which are widely denoted as “radical”. One of the main findings is that these environments do not seem to generate extensive hate to democracy or the Western World, rather the rejection of democracy should be seen as a result of individual choices.

The report concludes that used rigidly the definitions of radicalization provided by the Danish Police Intelligence Service and the Danish government are not very fruitful.

New report on radicalization among young Muslims in Aarhus, Denmark

The recently established Centre for Studies in Islamism and Radicalization has published its first research report entitled “Radicalization among Young Muslims in Aarhus”.

The new research report investigates the results of applying the Danish authorities’ definition of radicalization to existing Danish Muslim environments in Denmark, which are widely denoted as “radical”. One of the main findings is that these environments do not seem to generate extensive hate to democracy or the Western World, rather the rejection of democracy should be seen as a result of individual choices.

The report concludes that used rigidly the definitions of radicalization provided by the Danish Police Intelligence Service and the Danish government are not very fruitful.

Danish cartoonist attacked in his home Jan. 1, 2010

Kurt Westergaard, the Danish cartoonist who is known for his depiction of the Muslim Prophet Muhammad wearing a turban shaped like a bomb with a fuse, was attacked in his home January 1st by a Somali man armed with a knife and an axe.

In February 2008 the Danish Security and Intelligence Service arrested two Tunisian citizens and a Danish citizen who they suspected of planning to kill Westergaard. Since then Westergaard’s house has been heavily fortified and is under close police protection. Police officers were also attacked by the intruder and shot him in the right leg and left hand. He was hospitalized, but not seriously injured, police said.

The 28-year-old Somali man will probably be charged not only with trying to kill Westergaard and attacking police officers but also with planning terror-related activities. Danish intelligence officials said the suspect is connected to the radical Islamist al-Shabaab militia, sympathizes with al-Qaida, and has been under surveillance by the Danish Intelligence Service for some time.

The Danish-Muslim Union condemns the attack and every form of extremism. Also the Muslim Council of Denmark condemns the attack on Kurt Westergaard and says “violence is by no means acceptable. Actions of this sort are irreconcilable with Islam”.

Denmark: Muslims Take Prophet Cartoons to EU Court

Danish Muslims are planning to take the Jyllands-Posten daily newspaper of Denmark, to Europe’s highest rights court over the publication of satirical caricatures of the prophet Muhammad. The move to take the case to the European Court of Human Rights comes one day after a Danish court rejected a lawsuit by seven Muslims against the newspaper’s editors for publishing the offensive cartoons. Danish Muslim leaders described the Danish court’s decision as disappointing, but have hope that the European rights court will give the case more attention.

Danish newspapers re-publish Muhammad cartoon; imams urge calm

Danish Muslim imams sought to soothe Muslim anger on Friday after newspapers reprinted a drawing of the prophet Muhammad that caused outrage in Islamic countries two years ago. The newspapers republished one of the drawings in protest against what they said was a plot to murder the cartoonist who drew it. Mostafa Chendid, an imam at the Islamic Faith Community, said Danish media had confused freedom of expression with the freedom to insult others. He also called for Muslims to turn the other cheek rather than pursue violence. Several hundred Muslims gathered in central Copenhagen on Friday to protest the publication of the cartoon, shouting, God is great. Five major Danish newspapers, 10 smaller papers, and a Swedish daily reprinted the drawings. “Freedom of expression gives you the right to think, to speak and to draw what you like… no matter how many terrorist plots there are,” an editorial in the Berlingske Tidende paper noted.