Pre-Trial Comments for Dutch Turkish Woman Accused of Killing Lover

31 July 2013

 

The lawyer for a Turkish woman accused of shooting her lover last February has commented that she did so under threat from her husband, according to the Dutch Algemeen Dagblad newspaper.

Ramazan Korkmaz was discovered injured in his car in the city of Vlaardingen. He subsequently died. Serma K, a 37 year old woman whose relationship with Korkmaz was discovered through text messages, was arrested in connection with the shooting. Upon arrest, Serma K shouted that she had cleansed her “honour”.

Serma K’s lawyer has now commented that the shooting occurred due to pressure exercised upon the woman by her husband, following the discovery of the affair. According to the lawyer, her husband “shaved her head. She was also assaulted, degraded and raped by him…”. The lawyer made the comments during a pre-trial in a Rotterdam court, adding that Serma K. fees safe enough to tell her story now that her husband is in custody for incitement to murder.

Man who threatened to kill Prince Harry ‘radicalised in prison’

Ashraf Islam walked into a police station in Hounslow and made threats to kill the third in line to the throne a day after the murder of 25-year-old soldier Lee Rigby in Woolwich in London. Islam is thought to have changed his name from Mark Townley and converted to Islam while in jail in Northern Ireland. Islam had different aliases and a string of fraud convictions. After he admitted the threats to kill Prince Harry police found evidence on his laptop that he had visited terrorist and weapons websites. The 30-year-old pleaded guilty to making threats to kill at a hearing in Uxbridge and is in custody awaiting sentence. There are fears Prince Harry could be a target for the Taliban after he completed two tours of Afghanistan, and his security had already been stepped up following the murder of Drummer Rigby.

 

French ‘jihadist’ returned to France

Liberation

14.05.2013

Gilles Le Guen, who was arrested at the end of April in Mali, has been returned to France where he was immediately taken into custody by Central Directorate for Interior Intelligence.  The 58-year-old was arrested in the Timbuktu region of Mali by French army units, who have joint the Malian government in combating Salafi groups in the North. The man is suspected of having fought alongside the Salafis for the imposition of a Sharia law ruled state. Le Guen’s arrest made several headlines in France and brought the subject of ‘home-grown terrorism’ back onto the national forefront. The French Government accuses him of having fought in ‘jihadist groups’ and being a ‘fanatic’ and a ‘clueless person who became a terrorist’.

Le Guen is to face several weeks of interrogation by the intelligence unit and a prolonged a jail term.

Investigation Finds Women at Risk in Sharia Courts

7 April 2013sharia documentary

A Crown Prosecution Service investigation of a number of Sharia courts operating in mosques across the country found that these courts may be risking the safety of women by ruling in favor of possibly abusive husbands. Continue reading “Investigation Finds Women at Risk in Sharia Courts”

CAIR Welcomes S.C. Jail’s New Policy Allowing Hijab

(WASHINGTON, D.C., 3/14/13) — The nation’s largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization today welcomed a decision by a South Carolina jail to allow female inmates to wear religious head coverings, called “hijab.”

The Washington-based Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) made the request for a policy change following a complaint from a Muslim woman who was taken into custody on December 31, 2012, and was allegedly told to remove her hijab so she could have her booking photograph taken. The booking officer reportedly disregarded the woman’s religious concerns and “intimidated” her into removing her scarf in the presence of a male officer. The Muslim inmate’s husband was allegedly informed that “all Muslim women take off their scarves” when in custody.

In a letter to CAIR, Ronaldo D. Myers, director of the Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center in Columbia, S.C., wrote:

“As requested, we have reviewed and updated our policies to ensure clarity with our staff on the processing and searching of female detainees of the Muslim faith, and specifically have exempted the wearing of religious headwear from our facility’s ‘Prohibited Acts’ policy.”

“We welcome the detention center’s decision to allow detainees to exercise their constitutionally-protected religious freedom,” said CAIR National Legal Director Nadhira Al-Khalili. “We have recently received reports of denial of religious rights at correctional institutions in other states and are working to achieve similarly positive resolutions in those cases.”

It’s not often a Muslim woman ends up in jail, say King County officials.  But, a few years ago, a woman was forced to remove her headscarf – or Hijab — during her one-night stay in jail. She described it as humiliating, similar to being forced to take off her clothes.

“This is a larger issue of how is our jail balancing peoples’ right to express their religion … even in a correctional environment,” says Jennifer Gist of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, an advocacy group for Muslims.

Jews and Sikhs have come to King County jails requesting they keep their headwear too. While the county jail and court staffs were open to accommodating religious beliefs, they did have some problems to solve.

Plan for hunting terrorists signals U.S. intends to keep adding names to kill lists

Editor’s note: This project, based on interviews with dozens of current and former national security officials, intelligence analysts and others, examines evolving U.S. counterterrorism policies and the practice of targeted killing. This is the first of three stories.

Over the past two years, the Obama administration has been secretly developing a new blueprint for pursuing terrorists, a next-generation targeting list called the “disposition matrix.”

The matrix contains the names of terrorism suspects arrayed against an accounting of the resources being marshaled to track them down, including sealed indictments and clandestine operations. U.S. officials said the database is designed to go beyond existing kill lists, mapping plans for the “disposition” of suspects beyond the reach of American drones.

Although the matrix is a work in progress, the effort to create it reflects a reality setting in among the nation’s counterterrorism ranks: The United States’ conventional wars are winding down, but the government expects to continue adding names to kill or capture lists for years.

Among senior Obama administration officials, there is a broad consensus that such operations are likely to be extended at least another decade. Given the way al-Qaeda continues to metastasize, some officials said no clear end is in sight.

Officials declined to disclose the identities of suspects on the matrix. They pointed, however, to the capture last year of alleged al-Qaeda operative Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame off the coast of Yemen. Warsame was held for two months aboard a U.S. ship before being transferred to the custody of the Justice Department and charged in federal court in New York.

The issue resurfaced after the U.S. raid that killed bin Laden. Seeking to repair a rift with Pakistan, Panetta, the CIA director, told Kayani and others that the United States had only a handful of targets left and would be able to wind down the drone campaign.

A senior aide to Panetta disputed this account, and said Panetta mentioned the shrinking target list during his trip to Islamabad but didn’t raise the prospect that drone strikes would end. Two former U.S. officials said the White House told Panetta to avoid even hinting at commitments the United States was not prepared to keep.

Judge calls Minn. terror defendant who recently worked at a school a ‘danger’ to the community

MINNEAPOLIS — A Minnesota man who has been accused of using his knowledge of the Quran to persuade young men to leave the state in 2007 and fight with the terror group al-Shabab in Somalia has been working in a position of authority at an Islamic school, authorities said Wednesday.

Chief U.S. District Judge Michael Davis called Omer Abdi Mohamed a “danger to the community,” and ordered that he remain in custody until he is sentenced on one terror-related count in the government’s ongoing investigation into the recruiting of more than 20 young men who authorities say left Minnesota to join the al-Qaida-linked group.

Mohamed, 27, pleaded guilty last year. He was free, pending sentencing, but was arrested last week after authorities said he violated conditions of his release by not disclosing the nature of his employment.

Prosecutors said Mohamed had been working at Essential Learning of Minnesota Institute, a nonprofit program that offers after-school homework help, recreation activities and religious classes to children. Mohamed told his probation officer he was a volunteer teacher’s assistant, but some parents told the FBI that he was a manager or director.

English Defence League cancels anti-Muslim march

20 October 2012

 

The English Defence League (EDL) is set to march in Walthamstow, east London, on Saturday. The move is thought to be very provocative since the area is densely populated with Muslims. In addition, Leader Tommy Robinson vowed to show the inflammatory film Innocence of Muslims in the suburb. However, he was arrested in the US and remains in custody. Also, according to the reports, the co-founder of the EDL will not be attending the march as he was arrested by Scotland Yard on suspicion of conspiracy to cause a public nuisance in east London.

Man Is Accused of Jihadist Plot to Bomb a Bar in Chicago

An 18-year-old suburban Chicago man, who the authorities say was enamored with Osama bin Laden and intent on killing Americans, has been arrested after attempting to detonate what he thought was a car bomb outside a Chicago bar, officials said Saturday. There was never any danger that the suspect, Adel Daoud, would actually detonate a bomb. The plot, which ended with Mr. Daoud’s arrest on Friday, was proposed by undercover F.B.I. agents posing as extremists, according to a statement released by the United States attorney’s office in the Northern District of Illinois.

Mr. Daoud, a United States citizen who lives in Hillside, Ill., on the outskirts of Chicago, has been under surveillance for months, and in multiple conversations with agents expressed a desire to kill on a mass scale as revenge for what he believed was the persecution of Muslims by the United States, according to court papers.

Adel Daoud first came to the attention of the authorities in October 2011, when he sent out e-mails “relating to violent jihad and the killing of Americans,” according to an affidavit in support of the complaint. At one point he sent out several e-mails with a PowerPoint presentation titled “The Osama bin Laden I Know,” in which he defended Bin Laden’s tactics.

“Osama wasn’t crazy for wanting to destroy America,” he wrote. “This superpower killed millions of people.”

Mr. Daoud remained in custody after being charged in United States District Court on Saturday with one count of an attempt to use a weapon of mass destruction and one count of attempting to damage and destroy a building by means of an explosive.

Lawyers for the defendants in such cases have typically accused the government of entrapment, arguing that their clients would never have acted without being coerced by undercover agents.

Trial of Mohammed Merah’s brother in France

News Agencies – September 10, 2012

 

French judges grilled the brother of Mohammed Merah, the al Qaeda-inspired terrorist who carried out a series of deadly shootings in Toulouse last March. Abdelkader Merah has denied being complicit in his brother’s deadly acts and has told judges he had no part in the series of deadly shootings that claimed lives of seven people in Toulouse earlier this year.

 

Abdelkader Merah, 29, faced lengthy questioning by specialist anti-terrorist judges for the first time on Monday. His 23-year-old sibling was behind the cold-blooded killing of three Jewish children, a Rabbi and three soldiers in and around the southwestern city of Toulouse in March this year.

Abdelkader has been held in custody since the killings on suspicion of complicity in terrorism, murder and theft. He is currently the only suspect in custody for an alleged role in the murders. His lawyer, Eric Dupond-Moretti, rejected the accusations, saying his client “absolutely contests the charge of complicity to murder, which is not based on any objective element.”

According to a police source in March, Abdelkader admitted to being present on March 6 when his younger brother stole the scooter used in all of the attacks, but claimed he did not realise it was to be used to carry out a shooting spree. He was also grilled over his extreme religious beliefs.