Arrests of Americans in Pakistan raise concerns about possible trends of homegrown terrorism and radicalization abroad

In the years since 9/11 no further terrorist attacks have occurred, and the American war on terror was partly predicated upon the idea that fighting terrorism abroad will prevent fighting it at home. But a recent string of terrorism arrests is challenging the idea that American soil is immune to homegrown radicalism. The Obama Administration this week conceded that the US now faces a rising threat of homegrown radicalism.

This raises a new question: are Muslims in the US really more assimilated and less prone to extremism than European Muslims?

Bruce Hoffman, Georgetown University terrorism expert says “it is myopic to believe we could insulate ourselves from the currents affecting Muslims everywhere else.”

Preventing Fort Hood?

It’s reported that the FBI and Army intelligence investigated contacts between the alleged shooter and a militant Islamist cleric who is calling him “a hero.” Why did the FBI and the Army decide not to pursue his contacts the cleric? Did they know that Hasan warned fellow officers that Muslim soldiers could be dangerous because of conflicts about fighting in Muslim countries? Is al Qaeda telling Muslim soldiers to commit violence? Do they face discrimination, especially where Christian fundamentalism is widespread?

This hourlong interview explores these questions with the following guests:

Josh Meyer: Staff Writer, Los Angeles Times
Bruce Hoffman: Professor of Security Studies, Georgetown University
Salam Al-Marayati: Executive Director, Muslim Public Affairs Council.
Mona Charen: author and syndicated columnist
Mikey Weinstein: President of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation

US Qaeda strategy seen as fatally flawed; Analysts: US policy of mixing up between Qaeda, other insurgencies, innocent civilians increases terrorism

By Michel Moutot In its ideological struggle against Al-Qaeda, American anti-terrorist strategy too often overlooks the basic tenets of the infamous Chinese warlord Sun Tzu, namely: know your enemy. That is the fixed view of leading analysts, who conclude that through ignorance of the enemy it faces, ignorance of its nature, its goals, its strengths and its weaknesses, the United States is condemned to failure. “The attention of the US military and intelligence community is directed almost uniformly towards hunting down militant leaders or protecting US forces, (and) not towards understanding the enemy we now face,” said Bruce Hoffman, a professor at Georgetown University, Washington DC.