British diplomats, Muslim figures condemn Trump’s travel ban

Diplomats and prominent Muslims in Britain have condemned US President Donald Trump’s decision to temporarily ban all refugees and citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

Their criticisms come awkwardly just two days after UK Prime Minister Theresa May officially met with Trump, the first foreign leader to do so, touting the two countries’ “special relationship.”
Trump on Friday signed an executive order banning citizens from Syria, Iraq, Iran, Yemen, Libya, Somalia and Sudan from entering the United States for the next 90 days and suspending the admission of all refugees for 120 days.
British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson described Trump’s ban as “divisive and wrong,” while London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the move was “shameful and cruel.”
But Prime Minister May refused to condemn the ban. Under pressure from British MPs, she later said the government does “not agree” with the executive order.
May also ordered Johnson and Home Secretary Amber Rudd to contact their US counterparts “to protect the rights of British nationals,” the Prime Minister’s office said.
When she had hoped to reap the benefits of rushing to America to shore up support ahead of a bruising Brexit battle, she’s being slammed to the ropes by the United Kingdom’s main opposition party.

Boris Johnson calls for new word to be used when describing Islamic extremists

Boris Johnson has insisted that an alternative word needs to be found to describe extremists who claim to act in the name of Islam. The Mayor of London told worshippers at the Al Falah Islamic Education Centre in West Acton that he was concerned about the level of Islamophobia in the capital. And Mr Johnson, whose great-grandfather was a Muslim, added that a “problem in the language” needed to be resolved, with the issue discussed with the Muslim Council of Britain.

The Mayor insisted the police could deal with Islamophobia and intimidation, adding: “It’s very difficult to distinguish Islam and Isis, Daesh, whatever – we have a problem in the language. “When anybody says Islamism, Muslim fundamentalist or terrorist or something like that, the wider public hear the word Muslim – you see what I’m saying? So you need to find an alternative word. I had a really good session with the Muslim Council of Britain to find an alternative word. It’s not easy.”

Boris Johnson is criticised by MCB for ‘pornfreak jihadists’ comment

The Mayor of London complained that he had been criticised by the moderate Muslim group after he made comments about Islam in January. In a discussion about Islamist fighters, Mr Johnson had told The Sun newspaper that “this one religion seems to be leading people astray in so many cases”. In the same set of comments he also argued that Isis jihadists were driven to violence by an obsession with pornography.

He said, “I was astounded to be denounced, on the front page of The Guardian, by the Muslim Council of Britain,” he wrote in his regular Daily Telegraph column, released this morning. “A spokeswoman said that I was somehow attacking Muslims as a whole. Why on earth would she say that? Why is the MCB effectively claiming these porn freak jihadists for mainstream Islam?”

In his January comments to The Sun Mr Johnson had described jihadis as “literally w*****s”, arguing “They are not making it with girls, and so they turn to other forms of spiritual comfort — which of course is no comfort.”

At the time, he also told the newspaper: “I often hear voices from the Muslim intelligentsia who are very quick to accuse people of Islamaphobia.

“But they are not explaining how it can be that this one religion seems to be leading people astray in so many cases. They are not being persuasive in the right way with these people.”

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, claims jihadists are ‘sexually frustrated losers’

Mayor of London Boris Johnson says that jihadis are "sexually frustrated losers."
Mayor of London Boris Johnson says that jihadists are “sexually frustrated losers.”

London’s mayor had some choice words Friday for Muslims who turn to radicalism, calling them sexually frustrated losers who turn to terrorism out of a deep-seated lack of self-confidence. Johnson further contended that turning to radical Islam was a form of compensation for men with deflated egos and a lack of purpose: “They are just young men in desperate need of self-esteem who do not have a particular mission in life, who feel that they are losers and this thing makes them feel strong — like winners.”

The 50-year-old politician, who reportedly has his eyes on the premiership, went on to criticize elements of the Islamic community for not doing enough to convince young men to turn away from extremism: “I often hear voices from the Muslim intelligentsia who are very quick to accuse people of Islamophobia… But they are not explaining how it can be that this one religion seems to be leading people astray in so many cases.”

“Somebody in a position of responsibility should be making responsible comments,” Mohammed Khaliel, director of the community cohesion organisation Islamix, told the Guardian on Friday. “For somebody allegedly aspiring to be prime minister of the country, is this really the style and level of comments that he should be making?

Charlie Winter from the Quilliam Foundation, an organization set up by ex-Islamists to challenge and counter extremism, called the mayor’s analysis “ludicrous,” stating that many defy the caricature painted by Johnson.

Boris Johnson says radicalisation should be treated as child abuse

March 2, 2014

 

Muslim children who are at risk of being “radicalised” by their parents should be taken into care, according to the London mayor Boris Johnson. Defining young people being “taught crazy stuff” at home as effectively child abuse, Mr Johnson said the efforts of counter-terrorism officers and social care workers were being hampered by “what I am obliged to call political correctness”.

He said the law needed to be changed so that children who are “being turned into potential killers or suicide bombers” can be taken away from their parents, “for their own safety and for the safety of the public”.

Mr Johnson wrote: “The most important question [after the murder of Lee Rigby] is how we prevent other young men, and women, from succumbing to that awful virus: the contagion of radical Islamic extremism. Paedophilia, Female Genital Mutilation, Islamic radicalisation – to some extent, at some stage, we have tiptoed round them all for fear of offending this or that minority. It is children who have suffered.”

 

The Independent

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/boris-johnson-muslim-children-being-taught-crazy-stuff-at-home-should-be-taken-into-care-9165308.html

The Guardian

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/mar/03/boris-johnson-radicalisation-child-abuse

Boris Johnson: forcing children to wear burka to school is against country’s values of liberty

The Mayor of London said the burka, or full Islamic veil which leaves only a mesh for the eyes cannot be described as a school uniform. He was speaking after it emerged a number of secondary schools have forced children as young as 11 to wear the full covering when outside school.

 

The Madani Girls’ School in Tower Hamlets, east London, stipulates that girls must wear a full burkha and a black coat when outside school. Girls at the Jamea Al Kauthar school in Lancaster are required to cover their faces when outside the school and wear a jilbab, or long flowing black gown that covers the head and body but leaves the face exposed, when inside. The Ayesha Siddiqa Girls School in Southall, West London, requires girls to wear the jilbab when travelling to lessons.  All three are independent fee-paying schools. There had been plans to turn Madani girls’ school into a state-funded Muslim school.

 

Parliament said this week it backed the rights of schools to set and enforce their own uniform policies but Mr Johnson said: “I don’t think it can be classed as any kind of uniform. I’m totally against any kind of compulsion in this matter. If a school is forcing children to wear the veil, that in my view is completely wrong, adding: “That is against my principles and it’s against the principles of liberty that London should stand for.”

Baroness Flather’s anti-Muslim comments spark debate

26 November 2012

 

Baroness Flather, who was an influential member of the Conservative party, has come under heavy criticism after her remark that that all Muslims in Britain live on benefits.

 

She made the comments in support of a Conservative party adviser Lynton Crosby. Crosby led London Mayor Boris Johnson’s two election campaigns. He is of Australian origin and known to be a master of dirty political games; it was reported that one piece of advice he gave Johnson was not to canvas the votes of “f***ing Muslims”. People close to him later insisted that it was not a racist remark but rather just his style.

London Mayor Boris Johnson Regrets his Islamophobic Comments Prior to the Election

29 April 2012

Boris Johnson, who has always had uneasy relations with half a million Londoners, made a drastic move prior to the local election. In a meeting at the Regents Park Mosque involving representatives of more than 50 mosques, the London Mayor admitted that he did not engage with the Muslim community.

Mr Johnson also promised that if he is re-elected he will make it up to Muslims, and expressed his positive feelings for Islam.

Newt-loving socialist or floppy-haired bike rider? One will be London’s Olympic mayor

LONDON — One sports an unruly blond mop, spouts Latin aphorisms and loves to ride his bicycle. The other is a neat, newt-loving socialist who prefers to travel by subway.

Their contest is an Olympic-size grudge match. Meet Boris and Ken — hometown celebrities known universally by their first names. When the 2012 London Games open on July 27, one of them will stand before billions of television viewers as mayor of the host city.

The incumbent, Boris Johnson, warns that it had better be him and not Ken Livingstone — his predecessor, intense rival and would-be successor.

Whoever wins, London’s next mayor will be a larger-than-life figure whose gaffes and idiosyncrasies would have sunk a less confident politician. The winner will oversee a world-class city of 8 million people and a 14 billion-pound ($22 billion) budget.

Johnson, a Conservative, hopes to win a second four-year term while Livingstone, London’s mayor from 2000 to 2008, is from Labour — but both transcend the parties they nominally represent.

His views on international issues are more controversial. Livingstone once called President George W. Bush “the greatest threat to life on this planet,” welcomed hard-line Muslim cleric Yusuf al-Qaradawi to London, and was suspended from his post for a month after comparing a Jewish reporter to a Nazi concentration camp guard.

Livingstone denies anti-Semitism, but his words have alienated many Jewish voters.

Both men are also known for their busy private lives. Livingstone has five children with three women, while Johnson was once fired from a Conservative post for lying about an extramarital affair.

They seem to have a visceral animosity, getting into a shouting match in an elevator after a recent radio debate, with Johnson repeatedly calling his rival an “(expletive) liar” for claims about Johnson’s tax status.

The dispute ended with the candidates publishing their tax records, which showed that both earn many times more than the average Londoner: 1.7 million pounds ($2.7 million) over four years for Johnson; 342,000 pounds ($540,000) for Livingstone.

Met’s most senior Muslim woman ‘ostracised’

A Muslim woman responsible for upholding racial and religious diversity within the Metropolitan police claims she was so marginalised that she was not even allowed to make the coffee. Yasmin Rehman, 42, the force’s director of partnerships and diversity, is taking her bosses to an employment tribunal claiming she was bullied because of her colour and sex. She says one female detective told her not even to touch her coffee cup because she was Muslim, according to legal documents. At every turn her colour, religion and sex caused her to be “undermined, marginalised and excluded”, she claims. Her treatment at the hands of her white colleagues became so unbearable she is off work with stress and has considered suicide, she says in documents. A copy of Rehman’s employment tribunal claim, lodged with the tribunal and the force and passed to The Sunday Times, reads: “[A senior detective] stated she did not want the claimant to touch her coffee cup or ever make her coffee.
“This was soon after the July 2005 bombings and [the detective’s] reasons for saying this were apparently connected to the bombings.” Her case is the latest in a series of disputes about the treatment of racial minorities within the ranks of Britain’s constabularies, and particularly the Met.
Two weeks ago, Jacqui Smith, the home secretary, ordered a race review following a decision by Boris Johnson, the London mayor, to launch an inquiry into “racism” concerns voiced by some ethnic officers and staff at the Met.

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