Relaxed photographs of ‘suicide bomber Briton’ emerge

February 14, 2014

 

Pictures of a man suspected to be Britain’s first suicide bomber in Syria have emerged showing him looking relaxed and smiling with local children. The images were sent by Abdul Waheed Majeed, 41, from Syria to his family in the Langley Green area of Crawley, West Sussex. In one picture, he is seen wearing pink Minnie Mouse-style ears while he cuddles a child. In another, he is pictured kneeling surrounded by children as they give the peace sign.

Married father-of-three Majeed is suspected of driving a lorry into a jail in Aleppo and detonating a bomb last week. Officials have not confirmed the identity of the bomber amid reports that a UK jihadi, who used the name Abu Suleiman al-Britani, carried out the bombing.

Counter-terrorism officers have searched Majeed’s home in Martyrs Avenue, which is also the ex-home of schoolgirl Sarah Payne’s killer Roy Whiting, according to neighbours. Majeed, known as Waheed, left Britain six months ago, telling his family he was going on a humanitarian mission to Syria. Majeed’s uncle, Mohammad Jamil, 65, said Majeed – who is a father of two boys and a girl aged 18, 16 and 12 – had never shown any sign of extremism.

But this week extremist preacher Omar Bakri Mohammed told the London Evening Standard that Majeed was ”a very dear brother”. He claimed Majeed had been an active student and valued member of the banned extremist Al-Muhajiroun organisation between 1996 and 2004 and had wanted to further the ”Muslim cause”. Bakri said Majeed would organise his sermons in Crawley and record the lectures and distribute them.

 

The Telegraph: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/syria/10638651/Relaxed-photographs-of-suicide-bomber-Briton-emerge.html

Islamists Suspected in Woolwich Attack

23 May 2013

 

A shocking machete attack on Lee Rigby, a military drummer and veteran of Cyprus and Afghanistan, was perpetrated in the Woolwich area of South East London Wednesday afternoon. One of the two suspected attackers, Michael Olumide Adebolajo, is a native of London and a convert to Islam, leading some to characterize the attack as an act of Islamist terrorism. The second attacker has been identified as Michael Adebowale, a native of Greenwich. The Daily Telegraph is calling the attack, “the first terrorist murder on the British mainland since the 7/7 suicide bombings of 2005.”

 

Accounts differ as to the nature of the attack, but witnesses claim that Adebolajo and Adebowale first struck Drummer Rigby with a vehicle, then attempted to decapitate him with a machete. Witnesses report hearing one of the attackers shout “Allahu akbar” (God is great) as they attacked Drummer Rigby. A group of women reportedly came to the aid of Drummer Rigby, covering his body and attempting to protect him.

 

The brazen nature of the murder, carried out around 14:00 GMT, suggests that the assailants wanted their actions to be witnessed. A video taken of Mr. Adebolajo shortly after the attack shows him justifying the murder by saying: “We swear by almighty Allah we will never stop fighting you until you leave us alone. Your people will never be safe. The only reason we have done this is because Muslims are dying by British soldiers every day.”

 

Instead of fleeing the scene, the attackers, one of whom may have been armed with a handgun, waited for armed police response unites to arrive, apparently hoping for a confrontation. Unconfirmed reports indicate that approximately 15-20 minutes elapsed between the attack and the arrival of authorities and that once on the scene, armed police were charged by the attackers. A female officer confirmed that both men were shot by police.

 

Reports on Thursday suggested that officials in MI5, the domestic security service, were aware of both men alleged to have carried out the attack. Officials insist that there was no evidence that either of the men were planning this attack, but one of the men was apparently prevented from traveling to Somalia to join the Islamist group Al-Shabaab last year. The Independent is reporting that at least one of the attackers was inspired by sermons delivered by the banned Islamic cleric Omar Bakri Mohammed, who established Hizbut-Tahrir in the UK and now lives in Lebanon. The Guardian is reporting that Mr. Bakri Mohammed claims to have tutored Mr. Adebolajo after he converted to Islam in 2003. The BBC has obtained footage apparently showing Mr. Adebolajo standing next to Anjem Choudary, leader of the banned al-Muhajiroun group, at an Islamist rally in 2007. Mr. Choudary appeared on Newsnight on Thursday, claiming Adebolajo “went his own way” in 2010 and that he was surprised by the attack.

 

Mr. Adebolajo and Mr. Adebowale are being treated in separate hospitals and both are too injured to be questioned by authorities.

 

Salafism continues to spread over Europe

Mohamed Merah, the alleged murderer of Toulouse was last year at a Salafi conference held in Catalonia. State Information Services alerted France counterparts about the visit and now the Spanish police are looking for what kind of connections and relationships Merah had with Spanish and European Salafists.

Islamist experts now insist that Al Qaeda is not a movement but an ideology. Omar Bakri[1] had also warned a year and a half ago in Tripoli during an interview with the Spanish news chain SER, “Open dialogue with Al Qaeda before it is too late, said Bakri. Al Qaeda is a phenomenon in which many people believe and you’d be surprised to know how many non Muslim people in Europe support Al Qaeda. People in Europe have not chosen to live in terror and Al Qaeda continues to spread it and continues to do what Islam brands: protect all Muslims from invasions “.
Bakri provides other data that was confirmed by the Western Information Services: the increase of the number of non-Muslims Salafis. They are converts who moved the objectives of Al Qaeda into their places of origin: United Kingdom, France, Italy, Spain and Germany.
The alleged murderer of Toulouse, Mohamed Merah, had French nationality but many Salafists marry nationals to obtain residence in parts of Europe. This is another of the modus-operandi that jihadists use to enter a country. The matter is concerning Spanish authorities as all Salafi leaders resident in Spain have permanent residence and work permit until 2014 because they married with Spanish women. The Minister of Interior is considering not renewing these residence permits and has already submitted several negative reports to the Ministry of Justice about permit renewal solicitations.


[1] Omar Bakri Mohammed, the radical cleric banned from Britain for glorifying terrorism; once nicknamed the Tottenham Ayatollah. http://www.canada.com/news/Radical+cleric+Omar+Bakri+Mohammed+threatens+Syria+with+wave+suicide+bombs/6051523/story.html

UK Muslim mob threatens to fly black flag of Islam over Downing Street for jailed cleric’s release

16 November 2010

Muslim radicals have vowed to fly the black flag of Islam above Downing Street, the official residence of the British Prime Minister, and the White House, the official residence of the US President, in protest over the imprisonment of cleric Omar Bakri Mohammed in Lebanon.
Omar Bakri Mohammed is currently serving a life sentence for training and fundraising for al-Qaida. Bakri has been banned from Britain since 2006. The Daily Express quoted Abu Saalihah, a student of Bakri’s, as saying: “We will not rest until the black flag of Islam is flown over the White House and 10 Downing Street.” The demonstration took place outside the Lebanese embassy in London.

Radical “Tottenham Ayatollah” sentenced to death in Lebanon

12 November 2010

Omar Bakri Mohammed, known as the “Tottenham Ayatollah”, was on the run after a court in Beirut found him guilty of funding al-Qaeda and starting a militant group to weaken the Lebanese government.
Bakri, who now lives in the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli, was one of 54 people convicted in the latest of a series of trials against suspected militants who fought clashes with the Lebanese army in 2007.
The Syrian-born preacher became an irritant to the British government after he hailed the September 11, 2001 terrorists as the “magnificent 19” and told the British public it was responsible for the attacks on tube stations in London four years later.

Banned extremists will be named and shamed

Extremists banned from entering the UK will be “named and shamed” under plans to be announced by the Government this week.

In the last three years, 230 people have been barred from entering the country because of their extreme views but they are not currently named publicly. However, the Home Office is expected to issue quarterly figures on exclusions and name some of those who are banned. A Home Office official said: “These measures are aimed at preventing anyone who will stir up tensions in the UK from entering the country. We have not named them in the past but now, when it was in the public interest, we will. They will also be placed on international watch lists which tell other countries that they have been banned and why they were not allowed in. Coming to the UK is a privilege. We don’t want people abusing that by stirring up tensions.”

The bans on high profile figures, including radical Isalmist cleric Omar Bakri Mohammed and Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrkhan, only became known after the individuals themselves spoke out against the decisions. Omar Bakri Mohammed was banned from the UK in the wake of the 7/7 terror attacks in London in 2005.

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Most British Muslims back the government’s plans to deport radical Islamist “hate preachers”

Most British Muslims back the government’s plans to deport radical Islamist “hate preachers” it says could inspire bombers like those who attacked London in July, a poll published on Sunday showed. The ICM poll found that 65 percent of Muslims backed the new government measures and 27 percent opposed them. Ninety percent said they would immediately tell police if they suspected someone was planning or had carried out a terrorist attack. Just over two thirds of those questioned said Britain’s 1.8 million Muslims bore “a lot” of responsibility for rooting out Islamist extremists, 19 percent said they bore “a little” responsibility and nine percent said they bore none. ICM interviewed 500 Muslims by telephone between Sept. 1 and 7 for the poll, published in the News Of The World newspaper. Home Secretary Charles Clarke has published a list of “unacceptable behaviours” which would prompt immediate action — either deportation or a ban on entry. Last month, Britain said it was detaining 10 people, including the alleged spiritual leader of Al Qaeda in Europe, Jordanian national Abu Qatada, and would deport them. It has also barred hardline Muslim cleric Omar Bakri Mohammed, who left for Lebanon last month, from returning to Britain. Civil liberties campaigners say they are worried Britain will deport people to countries where they might be tortured. The government responds that it is seeking agreements with other governments — like one it struck recently with Jordan — to guarantee the safety of deportees.

UK May Charge Clerics With Treason

LONDON, England (AP) — British prosecutors say they are considering treason charges against any Islamic extremists who express support for terrorism. Attorney General Lord Goldsmith’s office said the Crown Prosecution Service’s head of anti-terrorism would meet with senior Metropolitan Police officers to discuss possible charges against three prominent clerics as part of a crackdown on those the government believes are inciting terrorism. Clerics Omar Bakri Mohammed, Abu Izzaden and Abu Uzair, have appeared on British television in recent days. Goldsmith’s office said prosecutors and police would look at remarks made by the three and consider whether they could face charges of treason, incitement to treason, solicitation of murder, or incitement to withhold information known to be of use to police. Bakri Mohammed has reportedly said since the July 7 attacks that he would not inform police if he knew Muslims were planning another attack and he supports insurgents who attack troops in Iraq and Afghanistan. “No decision on charges has been made yet,” the attorney general’s office spokeswoman said, speaking anonymously because British civil servants cannot be named. The spokeswoman said prosecutors may also seek access to taped recordings made by an undercover Sunday Times reporter who reportedly recorded members of a radical group praising the suicide bombers as “The Fantastic Four.” The newspaper’s story said its reporter spent two months as a “recruit” of the group, the Savior Sect, and described the organization as inciting young British Muslims to become terrorists.