Salvini (Northern League): “Kyenge in a mosque? Is she in the Arab League’s Pocket?”

The League’s deputy secretary discussed the meeting between the Minister of Integration Cècile Kyenge and Muslim religious leaders. “They’ll take the eight mosques per thousand people and put the veil on women”

The visit of Kyenge the Grand Mosque of Rome yesterday passed quietly. Due to the wishes of the minister who wished to make the meeting almost “private,” routine, and away from the spotlight.

The visit, however, did not escape the deputy secretary of the Northern League Matteo Salvini, which in a few months may lead the party. The visit became the subject of yet another attack on the minister of integration.

“Today Mrs. Kyenge visited the mosque in Rome. Indeed this is a priority for Italians,” said Salvini on his Facebook page.

“It seems” added the Salvini “she has also discussed a future agreement between the Italian state and the Muslim community. Fine, but this agreement would allow eight Mosques per thousand and allow the veil on women.”

“What about Kyenge’s salary?” concludes Salvini “is she paid for by the Arab League?”

 

Arab-American leader’s grave desecrated at suburban cemetery

The Palestine-born resident of Hickory Hills served in the Arab League, helped build the Bridgeview mosque, and worked as a government diplomat until his death at 73-years-old.

Abdallah was buried at Evergreen Cemetery in 1999, left to rest underneath a stone obelisk bearing his name beside about 500 other Muslim graves in the cemetery.

On Thursday, a Muslim man discovered someone had written “Raghaed Killer,” (sic) homosexual slurs, and gang signs on Abdallah’s tombstone, the sixth time the tombstone was hit since March 2011.

Dutch court clears Arab League’s holocaust cartoon

Dutch judges have found the European Arab League not guilty of insulting Jews in publishing a cartoon suggesting they invented the Holocaust. The cartoon, first published four years ago and reprinted last year, was intended “to highlight double standards in society”. Judges ruled that while the court considered the cartoon insulting, the right to freedom of expression is more important, Nos tv reported.

Arab League in Netherlands faces fines for cartoons

Thu Dutch branch of the European Arab League should be fined for publishing a cartoon implying that Jews invented the idea that six million people died in the holocaust, according to the public prosecution department. The comments refer to the cartoons published on the EAL’s website four years ago in response to the Danish cartoons depicting Mohammed. The prosecution department made the comments Thursday, suggesting that the EAL be fined one thousand Euros and that Dutch representative Abdimoutalib Bouzerda face an additional five hundred Euros.

Arab League to Face Prosecution for Anti Semitic Cartoon

The Arab European League (AEL) is being prosecuted for insulting Jews by publishing a cartoon suggesting they invented the Holocaust, the Dutch public prosecution office said today.

Last month, Dutch prosecutors ordered the league to remove the cartoon from its website or face prosecution. The cartoon was punishable, they found, “because it offends Jews on the basis of their race and/or religion”, Agence France Press reports in The Peninsula. The public prosecution office said it told the AEL two weeks ago that publishing the cartoon was illegal but that it would drop the case if the group removed the cartoon from its website within two weeks and agreed not to republish it.

According to Reuters reports in SABC News, Abdoulmouthalib Bouzerda, chairman of the Dutch AEL, said the group had published a disclaimer at the time saying it did not support the views of the cartoons it used. Radio Netherlands Worldwide reports that the AEL acquiesced to the request, but then it put the cartoon back on the website claiming that the ruling was an instance of double standards, since the republication of the Danish cartoons of Muhammad was allowed in the Netherlands. It removed cartoon once again on September 2. Finally, DutchNews reports that the cartoon was taken off the AEL’s website three years ago, but the league decided to republish it to highlight the double standards operating in society, as the AEL prosecution comes after a decision not to put politician Geert Wilders on trial for republishing Danish cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad on his website.

Vatican: Accord promotes dialogue with Arab League

The Vatican has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Arab League, in a bid to strengthen political and cultural understanding. The Vatican memorandum was signed by senior Vatican official Dominique Mamberti, and Amr Moussa, secretary general of the Arab League. “The agreement further consolidates the existing ties of collaboration between the Holy See and the League of Arab States, especially at a political and cultural level, in favor of peace, security and stability, both regionally and internationally,” said a statement. The agreement comes as Catholic bishops across Europe prepare to meet Muslim leaders to promote dialogue at a conference to be held in the French city of Bordeaux.

Spain Revisits Its Arab Past, Rebuilds Bridges With Muslim World

MADRID – Spain, the Western country most marked by Arab civilization, solemnly decided to reopen the annals of its Arab past and to rebuild the bridges with the Muslim world, demolished with the fall of Granada in 1492, by signing the founding charters of “la Casa _rabe”, and of the International Institute of Arab Studies and the Muslim World. The Arab League and the UN Alliance of Civilizations co-sponsor the two new institutions.

World Muslim Body Criticizes Eu Over Cartoons

The leader of the world’s largest Muslim body criticized the European Union on Friday for what he described as an unsatisfactory response to the furor over the publication of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammad. Ekmeleddin Ihsanoglu, Secretary General of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), said that by simply regretting that Muslims found the cartoons offensive, EU foreign ministers had not gone far enough at a meeting in Brussels last week. “We expected the EU to address the issue of cartoons in a more fair way,” Ihsanoglu told a news conference in London. “I must say that we are not satisfied with the result of last week’s meeting in Brussels. The conclusion published by the European Union fell short of our expectations.” The 12 cartoons, which Ihsanoglu described as “insulting, ugly and uncivilized,” were first published by a Danish newspaper and then reprinted by papers across Europe. They sparked indignation and violence in the Muslim world, where images of the prophet are deemed blasphemous. At least 50 people were killed in anti-Western protests and three Danish embassies were attacked. The furor exposed a gulf of misunderstanding between the West, which defended the publication by citing the right of free speech, and Muslims who saw it as an attack on their beliefs. In their February 27 statement, EU foreign ministers issued a strong condemnation of attacks on EU citizens and property. Diplomats noted the statement was more critical of the Muslim reaction than one issued days earlier by the United Nations, the Arab League and the OIC, an umbrella group of 57 predominantly Muslim nations.