Alleged member of AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb area) expelled from Spain

March 18, 2014

 

Nouh Mediouni, a young North African, 23 years old, has been expelled from Spain on Tuesday after being arrested on the 23 April 2013 in Zaragoza as alleged member of Al Qaeda.
He is accused of being a member of AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb area) and was recruited through their digital forum. He received specific instructions for a trip to a jihadist training camp located in northern Mali.
At the time of the arrest , Nouh Mediouni had with him electronic devices to prepare a car bomb.

 

Aragon digital: http://www.aragondigital.es/noticia.asp?notid=118270#.UyqRyI722bg.twitter

The lonely wolves were part of one of the bloodiest fraction of the AQIM

24 April 2013

 

Nouh Mediouni, a member of Al Qaeda for the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), who was arrested yesterday in Zaragoza in the operation of the General Information Commissioner of the National Police, had numerous contacts with the “katibas” (units of combat), who were commanded by Moktar ben Moktar (presumed dead in the war in Mali, although his supporters say he is alive).
His “katibas’ split late last year from the AQIM and founded a new organization:” The signatories with blood. ” This was the Islamist faction who starred in the assault on the Algerian gas plant, which ended in complete failure, as the hostage plan to ask for money for their rescue was aborted by the security forces of that country.
Mediouni, who had been captured by a Moroccan Islamist who currently is in prison, is 23 and was arrested in Zaragoza. “Because of its high degree of radicalization, Nou Mediouni was recruited in this digital forum. Received specific instructions for the trip to a jihadist training camp located in northern Mali and directed by AQIM”.
The other arrested in Murcia, is Hassan El Jaaouani, of Moroccan origin, 52, unemployed. He had also established contact with the AQIM cell located in Mali and also responsible for the recruitment of radicals in Spain.
AQIM represents the main threat to Spain within the Islamic world. Its “press office” is entitled “Al Andalus”, referring to the terrorists claim to recover the Spanish territories, in order to establish now the “World Caliphate.”
Spain is a land of passage for the ‘jihad’ from Africa that aim to reach other European countries in order to organize “sleeping cells” or, where appropriate, carry out attacks.

Two people arrested in Spain for presumed connection to Al-Qaeda

Two men have been arrested this morning in Zaragoza and Murcia for being allegedly linked to Al Qaeda, as part of an operation ordered by the National Court.
The two suspected terrorists detained are Nou Mediouni, of Algerian origin, and held in Zaragoza, and Hassan El Jaaouani, of Moroccan origin, and arrested in Murcia. They are “supposedly radical members of a cell related to the terrorist organization AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb),” said a statement issued by the National Police.
However, Interior Minister, Jorge Fernandez, has not confirmed that the two men were related among them. Sources of the National Court also notes that it cannot be said yet that they belong to a jihadist cell, although both of them have visited radical Islamic websites. The profile of those detained, according to the police statement, correspond to the two people who recently committed the attack in the Boston Marathon.
The Interior Ministry said in a second press release that Nou Mediouni was a”regular user of a known radical Islamist platform based in Mali from which AQIM is responsible, and that recruits candidates presenting more radical profiles “. Mediouni, according to police, was recruited by the forum “for its high degree of radicalization” and was instructed to travel to a “jihadist training camp located in northern Mali and directed by AQIM.”However, the note explains, “strong international police pressure on the ground” prevented him to contact those responsible for the field and was forced to return to Spain.

Radicals leave Spain to fight in Mali

15 January 2013

Twenty individuals, identified as radical Islamists, have disappeared from their homes in the Spain, Ceuta and Melilla and they are believed to have traveled through Algeria, Morocco and Mauritania to Mali to join”jihadists”  factions who have occupied the North African country and are now the subject of a military operation by the French Army.
Young “Polisario” members and other radicals who have traveled to Mali in recent weeks, are tempted by AQIM Salafists and other two formations found in the area, the MUYAO (Movement for Unity and Jihad North Africa) and Ansar el Dine (Followers of the Faith) to join the cause of jihad (struggle) and to incorporate the north camps of that country. The total number of Islamist terrorists is about 5,000.

French Muslims Unite Following Al Qaeda Threat

November 1, 2010

Jonathan Laurence and Justin Vaïsse argue that in his recently released audio recording targeting France, al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was likely trying to further antagonize the tense relationship between the French state and the country’s Islamic population to further his goal of radicalizing European Muslims. But bin Laden demonstrated a fundamental misunderstanding of the current French social landscape: Rather than exacerbating tensions, his clumsy intervention might actually help fix some of the damage done by the French government’s hot and cold relationship with Muslim communities.
The country’s record during the last two years has been mixed for Muslims in France. At the local level, integration is indeed taking place: Islam is increasingly accepted as part of the French landscape; Muslim chaplains have been appointed in the armed forces; and mosque construction is no longer controversial, as it was earlier this decade. On Oct. 27, the al Qaeda leader issued a two-minute declaration threatening the death of seven hostages taken six weeks ago in Niger by offshoot-group al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and warning of attacks if France continues fighting alongside the United States in Afghanistan and proceeds with the burqa ban. By all appearances, it seems that bin Laden’s latest communiqué may have the effect of actually repairing the relationship between the French Muslim community and the wider electorate — and uniting them in a common cause: the battle over retirement benefits and budget cuts.

Sarkozy Condemns Killing of Michel Germaneau Suspected al-Qaeda Militants in Mali

French President Nicolas Sarkozy has confirmed the death of a French hostage killed by suspected al-Qaeda militants in north-west Africa. Sarkozy condemned the killing of 78-year-old Michel Germaneau as “odious”, saying it would not go unpunished. The leader of al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) had earlier said Mr Germaneau was killed in revenge for a failed rescue raid in Mali.

Mr Germaneau was kidnapped in Niger in April. A retired engineer, he was in the region as a volunteer aid worker. AQIM leader Abdelmalek Droukdel said in a statement broadcast by al-Jazeera that Mr Germaneau had been killed in revenge for a raid in which six militants died.

Al-Qaida kidnaps Spanish aid workers

Al-Qaida has taken responsibility for the November kidnapping of a Frenchman and three Spaniards working for the Catalan organization Barcelona-Acciò Solidaria.

They were seized in Mali and Mauritania by al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), an offshoot of Osama bin Laden’s al-Qaida. Claiming responsibility for the action via a video-tape, a spokesman announced that France and Spain will be informed of their demands for hostage release.

Later reports indicate that AQIM has made assurances that the hostages remain in good health and will be treated according to Islamic law.

Canadian diplomats freed from al-Qaeda captors in Mali

Freed Canadian diplomats Robert Fowler and Louis Guay left Mali yesterday aboard a Canadian government plane bound for Germany this weekend to be reunited with their families. The two men were freed by their al-Qaeda-linked captors after four months of captivity.

Two Europeans separately captured by al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) were simultaneously let go. Reports from Algeria suggest that an unnamed European government paid AQIM factions a multimillion-dollar ransom. While this transaction has not been officially confirmed, countries such as Germany and Austria have been reported to have made similar payments in parallel cases.

Before the release, the Canadian government had been mounting a massive diplomatic effort and rescue operation in West Africa. Officials in Ottawa said Canada paid no ransom.

Europe, very much on al-Qaida’s radar

At a recent security conference in Munich, U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates told European nations that they were under direct threat from Islamist extremists and that this phenomenon would not go away. Gates tied European security to NATO success in Afghanistan. In fact, Western intelligence services have recently established operational links between al-Qaida in Afghanistan and al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) whose goals include striking at the heart of Europe. Al-Qaida has not made any secrets of its eagerness to target Europe. Indeed, al-Qaida’s number two, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has repeatedly threatened Europe. In 2007, numerous al-Qaida-linked plots were foiled in Europe and several cells were dismantled in France, Spain, Denmark, Belgium, Germany and the UK. This led Gilles de Kerchove, the EU’s anti-terror chief, to say last November that al-Qaida was the biggest threat to Europe. Olivier Guitta reports.