Annual Reviving the Islamic Spirit convention takes place in Toronto

News Agencies – December 19, 2012

 

Thousands of Muslims from across North America gathered in Toronto from December 21 through December 23 for the annual Reviving the Islamic Spirit convention. “The conference has always been about uniting and joining hands with scholars, journalists, academics, representatives from other faiths, and artists to promote messages of peace and tolerance,” RIS spokeswoman Farhia Ahmed told OnIslam.net.

Themed “Divine Light for Living Right: The Light of Prophetic Guidance in the Midst of Modern Darkness”, the convention is organized and managed by approximately 400 young Canadian volunteers. It brings a galaxy of prominent Muslim scholars including Sheikh Abdallah Bin Bayyah, Karen Armstrong and Dr. Seyyed Hossein Nasr, an Islamic studies professor at George Washington University. Also attending are the Grand Mufti of Bosnia Mustafa Cerić, scholar Habib Ali Al-Jifri, Swiss professor Tariq Ramadan, Egyptian preacher Amr Khaled, Dr. Aisha al-Adawiyya; Dr. Tawfique Chowdhury; Yasmin Mogahed and Edina Lekovic.

Reviving the Islamic Spirit convention was first launched in 2003 by Muslim youth to tackle the backlash on Islam and Muslims after the 9/11 and to build a bridge of understanding with non-Muslims. Last year, over 20,000 people attended the event and for the first time tickets were sold out by the second day of the 3-day program.

 

A Call for Muslims in the West to Serve Their Societies: Interview with Amr Khaled

10 November 2010

Amr Khaled is one the best-known TV preachers of the Arab world, reaching millions of mostly young Muslims via satellite channels, internet, books, cassettes and CDs. In this interview with Christoph Dreyer, he talks about the role faith and activism can play for Muslims’ integration into Western societies. In recent years, Amr Khaled has increasingly taken on a global outlook, initiating a dialogue between Arab and Danish youths during the cartoon crisis and speaking out against religious extremism. Today he lives in Birmingham, UK.

A Call for Muslims in the West to Serve Their Societies: Interview with Amr Khaled

10 November 2010

Amr Khaled is one the best-known TV preachers of the Arab world, reaching millions of mostly young Muslims via satellite channels, internet, books, cassettes and CDs. In this interview with Christoph Dreyer, he talks about the role faith and activism can play for Muslims’ integration into Western societies. In recent years, Amr Khaled has increasingly taken on a global outlook, initiating a dialogue between Arab and Danish youths during the cartoon crisis and speaking out against religious extremism. Today he lives in Birmingham, UK.

The antidote to terror

Amr Khaled is a British-based preacher who is converting thousands of Muslims to the path of peace – and incurring the wrath of hardline Islam. Lesley White meets _the Arab Billy Graham’ (…) In March, Khaled launched a new show, An Invitation to Coexistence, the first time the four main Arabic cable and satellite stations, including the influential pan-Arab religious satellite channel Al-Risalah, have aired a programme in the same prime 9pm slot. The viewing figures are as yet unannounced, but there is talk of an unprecedented 50m record. Khaled’s shows are a revolution in Islamic broadcasting. On Al-Jazeera the esteemed cleric Sheikh Yusuf al-Qaradawi, bearded and cloaked, pronounces from behind a desk; but Amr strolls through a bright, modern studio in a cream linen suit, smiling and chatting as if he’s just arrived for Sunday lunch in the conservatory. The opening of his show Life Makers even features cartoons: ?a wretched little boy wearing a chain and collar engraved No goal in my life is led into the sunshine by an enlightened friend who tells ?him to look outside. On one stone sits a Koran and on another a cog, representing self-transformation through industry and effort.

The Telegenic Face of Conservative Islam

Early one gray Friday morning in late December, Mona K. left her parents’ house in a residential neighborhood in Alexandria, Egypt, and headed downtown to Al Amirat, a wedding hall facing the Mediterranean Sea. She was going to see Amr Khaled, a Muslim TV preacher. Khaled’s devotional programs are broadcast on Iqraa, a Saudi-owned religious satellite channel, and together with millions of other mostly young Muslims in the Middle East and Europe, Mona is a loyal viewer.