Man who criticized church’s Ramadan message goes to mosque

HARRISBURG, Pa. — A Pennsylvania politician who apologized for criticizing a church that posted a message wishing Muslims a “blessed Ramadan” attended a worship service and dined at a Harrisburg mosque.
School board member Matthew Jansen, invited to attend the Hadee Mosque on Friday, told members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community that his remarks earlier were part of a “knee-jerk reaction.”
Jansen is a member of the Spring Grove Area School District, based in York County, in the Harrisburg area.

Woolwich murder aftermath: Theresa May praises British-based Islamic group

Home Secretary Theresa May has condemned “all forms of extremism” as she praised a British-based Islamic group for its commitment to peaceful co-existence and charitable works. Mrs May said there had been an increase in attacks directed against Muslim communities since the “horrendous” murder of Drummer Lee Rigby in Woolwich last month. Mrs May was speaking at an event in the House of Commons marking the centenary of the establishment of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community in the UK. The branch of Islam was founded in the late 19th century in India, but its leader has been based in Britain since 1984 as a result of persecution in Pakistan, where they are officially declared non-Muslims. Mrs May said the Ahmadiyya were subjected to persecution in Pakistan and threats in the UK.

Ahmadi Muslim leader pushes plight in Congress

WASHINGTON — The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community is persecuted around the world, but it has plenty of friends on Capitol Hill.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., joined more than 20 House colleagues and at least one senator Wednesday (June 27) at a reception to mark the first visit of the Ahmadiyya’s spiritual leader, Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, to Congress.

The Ahmadiyya have faced severe repression, Pelosi said, “but you refused to turn to bitterness or vengeance.”

“The message we carry is ‘if you are being hurt, do not respond with hurt,’” said Ahsanullah Zafar, president of the Ahmadiyya community in the U.S.

Katrina Lantos Swett, the chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, asked the audience to stand up for the Ahmadiyya.

“The message of the Ahmadiyya community is a positive call for world harmony and liberty,” Swett said. “We who believe in peace and freedom dare not be silent.”

Muslim youth association visits 200 Canadian communities

Northumberland Today – April 20, 2012

 

In 14 months, the Ahmadiyya Muslin Youth Association of Canada has visited 200 communities in Canada, its 2,649 volunteers helping them reach 1.3-million people in a bid to promote peace, condemn terrorism and dispel myths about Islam. An auxiliary wing of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, the youth association was established as a non-profit charitable religious organization that has 65 chapters throughout Canada (and chapters in more than 200 countries worldwide).

 

Following successful events in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, the group has been visiting Ontario communities throughout the month of April. For more information, visit www.Quranopenhouse.ca .

Vandals caused $60,000 in damage to mosque under construction in Va.

Vandals attacked an under-construction mosque in Chantilly over the weekend, causing extensive damage, authorities said.
All of the mosque’s first-level windows and door glass were shattered by thrown rocks, causing about $60,000 in damages, according to Usman Ghumman, general secretary for the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community Mosque.

He said the doors and windows were custom made to match the mosque’s design and artifacts.

Fairfax County police found the damage the morning of Jan. 30, but said there is no evidence that the vandals entered the building. Empty beer cans, liquor bottles and rocks were also found scattered on the mosque’s grounds and roof.

“If one or two windows were broken, we would have thought it was a random act of vandalism, but all fingers are pointing toward being a hate crime,” Ghumman said.

Ahmadiyya Muslim Community of Ireland lays foundation stone for first mosque in Galway

17 September 2010

The foundation stones for the first purpose-built mosque of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community in Ireland have been laid in Galway by Mirza Masroor Ahmad, world leader of community, during his first visit to the country. The Masjid Maryam (Mary Mosque) is only the third purpose-built mosque in Ireland and the first in Galway.
Ahmadi Muslims have been living in Ireland for more than three decades. Several hundred members of the Ahmadi community were present at the foundation stone laying, which was followed by a civic reception which local religious leaders from different Christian churches and politicians attended.
The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community was founded by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad in 1889, and it is estimated that there are several million followers worldwide, mainly in a number of African states, Pakistan and Indonesia. Ahmadi Muslims face severe discriminations in several Muslim countries, such as Pakistan where they have been banned from identifying themselves as Muslims since the early 1980s.

UK Muslim convention to be used as ‘a rallying call for peace’

One of Britain’s oldest Muslim communities will use its annual gathering this weekend to show how it could provide a model for other Muslims of how to live in perfect harmony with others. This weekend, 30,000 members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community will gather for the biggest annual gathering of UK Muslims. This is the 42nd Annual Ahmadiyya Muslim Convention to take place in Britain and will be based in a huge temporary village of 200 marquees at a site near Alton, Hampshire on July 25-27. Khalifa Hadhrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, the head of the worldwide Ahmadiyya Muslim Community who is based in London, will invite the world to reflect on the true message of all religions, including Islam. It will be a rallying call for peace, to be replicated by Ahmadi Muslims in 190 countries across the world. Mr Rafiq Hayat, president of the UK Ahmadiyya Muslim Association, said the UK Government, which earlier this year launched a fund to support work that helps individuals, organisations and communities to tackle violent extremist influences, should first look at the good practices that already exist in Muslim communities such as the Ahmadiyya Muslim community. Jon Land reports.

Lawyer Calls Maryland Town’s Decision to Bar Muslim Group From Gatherings ‘Discriminatory’

A decision barring an American Muslim group from holding large national gatherings in a rural Maryland town has been called discriminatory, a lawyer specializing in religious rights argued. A zoning appeals board in the town of Walkersville voted unanimously to deny the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community permission to use area farmland for religious purposes. The board’s decision is irrational and discriminatory said Roman Storzer, attorney for the group. This conflict has been defined from day one by a desire to keep a Muslim group out of the area said Walkersville Mayor Ralph Whitmore. The Ahmadis had hoped to establish a small mosque on the site for regular use by about 20 nearby families, and hoped to also build two gymnasiums for use during conventions and recreation.