On social media, terror suspects left few signs of extremism

BOSTON — Usaama Rahim liked an Islamic State page on Facebook but also spoke out against the kind of violence Islamic State extremists are fomenting across the Middle East.  Killing people is anti-Islamic, Rahim wrote, arguing a key tenet of the faith is “we do not fight evil with that which causes a greater evil.”
Ibrahim Rahim, second from right, brother of shooting victim Usaama Rahim, reacts with a relative during a news conference Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Boston’s Roslindale neighborhood in the area where Rahim was shot to death. Police said Usaama Rahim had lunged at members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force with a knife when they approached to question him. (Elise Amendola/Associated Press)
Ibrahim Rahim, second from right, brother of shooting victim Usaama Rahim, reacts with a relative during a news conference Thursday, June 4, 2015, in Boston’s Roslindale neighborhood in the area where Rahim was shot to death. Police said Usaama Rahim had lunged at members of the Joint Terrorism Task Force with a knife when they approached to question him. (Elise Amendola/Associated Press)
Terrorism experts caution that extremists often chat, plot and recruit not on open social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter but in darker corners of the Internet, such as chat rooms and on blogs not readily viewable or even searchable by the public.