The Fall of Morsi divides Italian Muslim Youth

July 4, 2013

At 11:20 last night the news: Morsi is deposed. A heavy silence descended on Facebook and on phones that until shortly before were ringing. There are no more texts where friends were discussing Morsi, those in favor and those against. Then, little by little, everything seemed to perk up: a friend, Sara Sayed calls me: “Have you seen? The military did it,” while others say “Morsi paid for his errors, and the Egyptian people have done it.” The fall of the Egyptian president, one year after his election, divided the Muslim youth: There are those who weep and rejoice, those who do not know what to say and believe that Morsi was wrong but that a military government is absolutely unacceptable: a babel of opinions, thoughts and considerations which is part of the discussions of young Muslims in Italy.

“Morsi has done nothing for Egypt” says Sami Samarli “he made senseless speeches, instead Morsi had to propose solutions for the country.”

Sara Andil replied “The Egyptian economy was recovering and then after thirty years of dictatorship, Egypt was destroyed economically, as if they could think to fix everything in one year? Morsi needed more time.”

The clash between the different positions, however, is not limited to only the economy but it is also general: between those who support the Muslim Brotherhood and those who do not. Omar Afifi on this is clear “Morsi divided the country.”

“The Muslim Brotherhood has not been able to govern”

Khaled Al Sadat echoed this when he said “one must intervene if a task is not completed” and hopes that “God gives the best to Egypt.”

 

Karim El Sayed does not agree: “Morsi is still the president of all Egyptians, democratically elected therefore a military coup is unacceptable.”

“It’s true” he says “Mosaab Hamada Morsi has made big mistakes.” Omar Kudsi plays down everything with a bitter joke: “Just to remind you: Egypt – 2 Syria – 0”