Solidarity for Hassan Filahi, attacked for not making his daughters veil

Men of the civic council, both PDL (People of Freedom party)
members, of a village near Livorno publicly expressed solidarity for
Hassan Filahi who was attacked by Islamic  extremists because his
daughters don’t wear the veil. The two politicians claimed that
freedom of religion and of cultural expression must be upheld. The
attack on the man, they maintain, represents an unacceptable denial
of those freedoms and a violation by violent extremists.  The two
politician emphasized that their Christian beliefs led them to
support Hassan’s freedom to express his faith without fear, a key
for respecting human dignity and liberty.

“Muslims in Britain: An Introduction” by Sophie Gilliat-Ray (Cardiff University) Cambridge University Press, June 2010

Archaeological evidence shows there was contact between Muslims and the British Isles from the 8th century. Beginning with these historical roots, Sophie Gilliat-Ray traces the major points of encounter between Muslims and the British in subsequent centuries, and explores Muslim migration to Britain in recent times. Drawing upon sociology, anthropology, politics, and geography, this comprehensive survey provides an informed understanding of the daily lives of British Muslims. It portrays the dynamic of institutions such as families, mosques and religious leadership, and analyses their social and political significance in today’s Britain. Through the study of the historical origins of major Islamic reform movements, it draws attention to the religious diversity within different Muslim communities, and sheds fresh light on contemporary issues such as the nature of religious authority and representation. It also considers British Muslim civic engagement and cultural life, particularly the work of journalists, artists, sports personalities, and business entrepreneurs.

Contents
Acknowledgements; Preface; Part I. Historical and Religious Roots: 1. The roots of Islam in Britain; 2. The development of Muslim communities; 3. Middle Eastern religious reform movements; 4. South Asian religious reform movements; Part II. Contemporary Dynamics: 5. Profiling British Muslim communities; 6. Religious nurture and education; 7. Religious leadership; 8. Mosques; 9. Gender, religious identity and youth; 10. Engagement and enterprise; Epilogue; Appendix: Source notes for researchers; List of references; Glossary; Index.

Church plans to establish kindergarten for Muslims

The Protestant church in Mannheim has announced plans for building an “integration kindergarten” to accommodate Muslim children. The plans are a reaction to an envisioned Turkish kindergarten that would be run by DITIB, the Turkish-Islamic Union for Religious Affairs in Germany. It is a controversial project for fears of isolation instead of integration, and is also being criticised by Turkish parents. The church’s initiative is an attempt to show “true concern with the issue of integration” and a Muslim partner would accompany the planning process, the Protestant dean Günter Eitenmüller said.

Murfreesboro Islamic Center Hosts Open House to Open Minds

June 26, 2010

The Islamic Center of Murfreesboro opened it doors Saturday night to anyone who wanted to learn more about them. The center has out grown its current home on Middle Tennessee Blvd. They plan to build a new 52,000 square foot mosque on Veals Road. The plan meeting some serious opposition. People like George Erdel, who claims to have studied the religion for 11 years, believes Islam isn’t a religion, but rather a political movement.

Murfreesboro Islamic Center Hosts Open House to Open Minds

June 26, 2010

The Islamic Center of Murfreesboro opened it doors Saturday night to anyone who wanted to learn more about them. The center has out grown its current home on Middle Tennessee Blvd. They plan to build a new 52,000 square foot mosque on Veals Road. The plan meeting some serious opposition. People like George Erdel, who claims to have studied the religion for 11 years, believes Islam isn’t a religion, but rather a political movement.

Dutch Moroccan Youth Overrepresented in Crime Statistics

Researchers for the Tijdschrift voor Criminologie (Journal of Criminology) claim
this week that over half of Dutch Moroccan youths have come into contact with
the police: some 54% of young Dutch Moroccan men, compared with 23% of
young men in the country overall.
The research report was picked up by several newspapers offering differing
commentaries on the results. Dutch News notes that the research does not
indicate how frequently police contact resulted in charges and convictions. The
NIS News, on the other hand, reports that more than half of the Dutch Moroccan
youths “have committed one or more crimes before they reached the age of 22”.
The researchers do not conclude why Dutch Moroccan youth are
overrepresented in crime statistics. They suggest that low socioeconomic status
and cultural factors may play a role, as well as citing Belgian research indicating
that police are more likely to question immigrant youths than white natives.

French insults of World Cup team seen through racial and religious prism

Impostors. Arrogant. Money-hungry idiots. The insults aimed at France’s World Cup team have
been venomous following its drama-plagued early elimination from the international tournament.
Passionate hand-wringing at the humiliating fall of the team that won the 1998 World Cup can
be expected from dismayed French fans. But some worry that the tirades against the ethnically-
and religiously-mixed team are being too often seen through a racial prism, even if that’s not the
intent.
Members of the largely black team have been compared to “gang bosses” and “hoodlums” and
said to be disrespectful of France — terms often used to slur residents of the country’s minority-
and immigrant-filled suburban ghettoes. As a result, many say that such commentary sparks
racial hatred. The current attacks against the team can “encourage prejudice,” and “liberate racist
speech,” said the general director of the advocacy group SOS Racism, Guillaume Ayne.
On French radio, philosopher Alain Finkielkraut said the players represent the “spirit of the cité,”
a term used for ghettoized housing projects, which he said are “devouring” French society.

Far-Right Party Attacks Public Broadcaster

The far-right Freedom Party of Austria (FPÖ) has criticized the Austrian national public
broadcaster (ORF)’s documentary program, Am Schauplatz and its producers, Ed Moschitz
and Julia Kovarik, for their recent coverage of a protest against an Islamic centre in Vienna.
The documentary, entitled “The Fear mongers,” follows a pair of right-wing skinheads who
participated in the recent demonstration in Vienna’s Floridsdorf, where the leader of the FPÖ
gave a speech. Moschitz has been accused of biased reporting by the FPÖ, especially following
another report in which skinheads were to be seen attending an FPÖ rally. In response to the
party’s accusation that Moschitz had incited the youths to shout Nazi-slogans, the ORF has made
public all the raw material for the program, in which no such slogans are to be heard.