Research Volunteering Opportunities

Posted 11/01/2019

Neuroscience needs you!

Researchers at The University of Birmingham are investigating age-related changes in upper limb movement control and ways to combat potential declines.

You will be asked to visit the School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences for one 2hr session. During this session you will complete two simple motor tasks, separated by a break, whilst non-invasive brain stimulation is administered for a short period.

If you are 65yrs +, right-handed and might be interested in taking part, contact Matthew Weightman via email mcw423@student.bham.ac.uk (preference) or phone 07767351450 for additional information and screening questionnaires (please note, making an enquiry does not commit you to taking part).

Any travel expenses will be refunded.

We look forward to hearing from you.

 


Posted 07/11/2018

Study investigating how combined brain stimulation (tCS) and training affect memory performance

Researchers in the School of Psychology are looking to recruit healthy adults (aged 55-80) for a study investigating how combined brain stimulation (tCS) and training affect memory performance. Participants will be asked to complete several computer-based tasks whilst experiencing stimulation.

The experiment consists of 7 sessions (2h the first and last, 1h the ones in between). Compensation will be £100 for completing all the sessions.

To be eligible to take part, you must be between 55 and 80 in age and have:

  • No personal history of neurological or psychiatric disorder (e.g. depression, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, ADHD, Parkinson's disease, etc.) ;
  • No personal history of brain injury or trauma;
  • No personal or family history of epilepsy (immediate or distant blood relatives);
  • No on-going prescriptions for anti-psychotic, antidepressant or sedative medication;
  • No body implants (e.g., Heart pacemaker, Cochlear implant, Medication pump, Surgical clips);
  • Not had brain stimulation in the past six months;

If you are interested in participating in the study, contact the researcher: s.assecondi@bham.ac.uk  Tel: 0121 414 4637.

 


Posted 25/10/2018

A study comparing white blood cells in healthy people with those in patients with Multiple Myeloma

Researchers at the Clinical Immunology Service in the College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, are conducting a study comparing white blood cells in healthy people with those in patients with Multiple Myeloma. The aim of their study is to find out what effect the disease has on white blood cells.

You will be asked to come to the Medical School and donate 1 sample of blood. Your sample will then be processed and tested alongside the patient’s sample.

If you are aged 65 years or over and think you might be interested, please contact Dr Chicca directly telephoning (0121) 414 8458 or via email to i.j.chicca@bham.ac.uk for more information.

 


Posted 25/10/2018

Salivary specific antibody testing to assess protection against tetanus

Tetanus is caused by bacterial spores present worldwide in soil/animal intestines; this source cannot be eliminated but the disease is preventable with immunisation. Currently, 18 countries in Africa and Asia have not eradicated maternal and neonatal tetanus (MNT), responsible for ~ 50,000 deaths annually, and routine immunisation still fails to reach ~20 million infants worldwide. The World Health Organisation Global Vaccine Action Plan aims to strengthen routine immunisation and increase coverage.

We are carrying out a research study funded by the Medical Research Council to develop a new test try and improve how immunodeficiency against tetanus is diagnosed and monitored in the Clinical Immunology Service at the University of Birmingham Medical School.  We need saliva and blood samples (1 x 10 ml blood and 1 x  5 ml oral saliva sample)  from healthy control patients to help us validate this new test. This would involve a one-time-only study appointment.

If you are interested, please contact Dr Sian E. Faustini via email at S.E.Faustini@bham.ac.uk  or via mobile on 07865 450548 for more information.

 


Posted 20/06/2018

The Audiology and Otology Research team at UHB are looking for your opinions and views

The Audiology and Otology Research team at University Hospitals Birmingham are looking for your opinions and views on a research project that is in development. The research team aim to see whether a rapid response service to check patients hearing and if required provide hearing aids would improve the experience of patients with dementia, their families and the staff that look after them when they are admitted to hospital.

They would like your contribution and a critique of their study application to make sure they have considered everything from a patient perspective. This would initially be a one-off review where they would present their project and ask for feedback.

After the application is submitted they would like to have quarterly meetings where the project is reviewed and looked at by a group of public and patient volunteers to ensure that the project encapsulates a clinical and patient perspective throughout.

For further information please contact Amy Gosling - amy.gosling@uhb.nhs.uk

 


Posted 20/06/2018

Systemic Gut Microbiota Driving Sight-threatening Inflammatory Ocular Disease (StuDIOus)

The College of Medical and Dental Sciences are looking for 200 healthy volunteers to take part in a research project looking at Systemic Gut Microbiota Driving Sight-threatening Inflammatory Ocular Disease (STUDIOUS for short).

Billions of bacteria that live in or on our bodies, known as the microbiome, are essential to our health and wellbeing. The largest community live in our gut.  A healthy microbiome is a ‘diverse’ microbiome, containing a wide variety of different species. It is thought that an imbalance in the microbiome cause disease. Evidence is growing that suggests correction of the balance of bacteria may improve health status of the patient.

The eye is a unique privileged part of the human body and is protected from damage. These barriers break down in inflammatory disease. Researchers in the Academic Unit of Ophthalmology are interested in understanding the role of the microbiome in eye health and how it may impact on disease.  We are looking for healthy volunteers who can help. You will be asked to complete questionnaires and to provide us with small quantities of faecal samples (the size of a 50 pence coin), which can be collected at home and sent back to us by pre-paid post. You will be provided with gloves and collection kits.

To be eligible to take part you must not have an ocular infection/inflammation, or a past medical history of autoimmune disease, GI inflammation/surgery, cancer, or diabetes. You must not have taken any steroids or antibiotics in the last 3 months.

If you think you might be interested, please contact Dr Low directly by telephoning/text messaging 0759 559 5897 or via e-mail to l.low@bham.ac.uk for more information.

 


Posted 20/06/2018

Improving memory with combined brain exercise and stimulation

Researchers in the School of Psychology are investigating how combined brain stimulation (tCS) and cognitive training affect memory performance. You will be asked to come to the School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, on 7 occasions. The first visit will always be on a Friday and will include some computer-based memory tests and familiarisation with brain stimulation and will last 2 hours; the next 5 visits will last 1hours each, from Monday to Friday, where you will be asked to perform a simple computer game while being stimulated. The last visit will be on the next Monday and will last for 2 hours where you will repeat the computer-based tests of your first visit.

If you are aged between 55 and 75 years and think you might be interested, please contact Dr Sara Assecondi directly by telephoning 0121 414 4637 or via e-mail to s.assecondi@bham.ac.uk for more information.

Please note that making an enquiry does not commit you to take part. You will be compensated £100 for your participation in the study’s 7 sessions.


Posted 20/06/2018

Volunteers needed for a study of the effects of sleep on the brain and cognition

Researchers in the School of Psychology would like to know how older people’s brains and cognitive abilities respond to sleep duration and sleep quality.

You will be asked to visit our research facilities at the School of Psychology and the Birmingham University Imaging Centre on two occasions. During first visit (approximately 1.5 hours) you will complete few short cognitive tests, you will be given a set of questionnaires to complete and bring back with you when you come for the second visit. We will also give you an activity monitor (which looks like a small digital watch) to measure your sleep patterns. We will ask you to wear it for 2 weeks prior to the second visit. During the second visit, you will be asked to complete few computer tests measuring your memory and attention (approximately 1 hour) and following a short break, you will have a brain scan (approximately 1 hour).

If you are aged 65-85 years and think you might be interested, please contact Dr Chechlacz directly by telephoning 07557103957 or via e-mail to m.chechlacz.1@bham.ac.uk for more information.

Please note that making an enquiry does not commit you to take part. You will be paid £50 for participating

Read the Participant Information Sheet >>>


Posted 29/03/2018

Does lifelong exercise preserve muscle anabolic sensitivity in masters athletes?

The aim of this study is to characterise the extent to which master athletes preserve the ability to build muscle in response to exercise compared with non-exercising younger and older individuals.

The individuals we are aiming to recruit for the study are males aged between 60-80 years of age. To take part you must be healthy, non-smoker, non-diabetic, no muscular dystrophy, normal activity (not partaking in structured training).

The study will involve four testing visits to the School of Sport, Exercise & Rehabilitation Sciences at The University of Birmingham over the space of 1 week, where you will undergo an assessment of blood pressure, body composition (amount of fat and muscle) and muscle strength. You will also be willing to undergo muscle biopsy, blood and saliva sampling.

In return, you will gain an insight into how much fat and muscle you have, the rate at which you are able to build muscle in response to exercise and have access to expertise and advice from world-leaders in the field of exercise physiology, nutrition and metabolism.

If you would like to volunteer or want further information, please contact James McKendry at jxm965@student.bham.ac.uk or call 07879 332 731

View poster >>>